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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journeys and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Kellee and Jen, of Teach Mentor Texts, decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

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Last Week’s Posts

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

top ten tuesday animal planet 1 animal planet 2

screaming statue cody and the mysteries of the unintended Runaways

Tuesday: Bookworm Delights

Wednesday: Animal Planet’s Ocean Animals and Polar Animals

Thursday: Blog Tour, Authors Interview, Character Q&A, Giveaway, and Review!: Curiousity House: The Screaming Statue by Lauren Oliver and H.C. Chester
Giveaway open until Wednesday!

Friday: Cody and the Mysteries of the Universe by Tricia Sprinstubb

Sunday: Author Guest Post! “Reading the Middle Grade Mind” by Sally Barlow-Perez, Author of The Unintended Runaways

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 Last Week’s Journeys
Kellee

This week I had a much more successful reading week. It felt great to have a good reading week!

First, finished the two Camp Rolling Hills books:

camp rolling hills camp crossing over

I’ll be reviewing these books next week, but I recommend them both for middle school. I love how the campers seem like real middle schoolers.

I also finished my audiobook of The War That Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley.

war that saved

Oh. My. Goodness. What a phenomenal book! Everyone says how great it is, and everyone is not lying.  It reminded me of a Ruta Sepetys novel because you can tell the author did her research but also made sure to focus on her brilliant story. The audiobook is well done also; I can still hear Ada’s voice. It was heartbreaking yet uplifting. And what a fascinating point of view to tell a WWII story from!

And I dove into my library pile of nonfiction picture books that I have been recommended (All their photos are below because I’ll be reviewing them all this week!).

Ricki

Invisible Fault Lines

Invisible Fault Lines by Kristen-Paige Madonia kept me guessing! From the very first page, I wondered what happened to the narrator’s father. About halfway through, I realized that it didn’t matter what happened to him because this was a story about character. I enjoyed this one very much and am looking forward to sharing more on Thursday!

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This Week’s Expeditions
Kellee

unicorn vs. goblins Princess 3

Two of my favorite early reading series have new books, and they finally arrived from the library, so I am so excited to read them, and they are first on my TBR for the week.

masterminds

I also started a new audiobook: Masterminds by Gordon Korman. This book is on my #mustreadin2016 list because many of you loved it, and so far I am really enjoying it. I can tell something big is about to happen!

Ricki 

the memory of things

I think I might get started on The Memory of Things by Gae Polisner. I was excited to receive it on NetGalley and look forward to it!

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Upcoming Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday great monkey freedom in congo two friends hillary rodham clinton pink is for Invisible Fault Lines cici reno camp dork

Tuesday: Childhood Characters We’d Love to Revisit as Adults

Wednesday: From Kellee’s (Huge) Library Pile Part Eleven: Nonfiction Picture Books

Thursday: Invisible Fault Lines by Kristen-Page Madonia

Friday: Blog Tour, Author Guest Post, Giveaway, and Review!: Cici Reno #MiddleSchoolMatchmaker by Kristina Springer

Sunday: Author Guest Post! by Beth Vrabel, Author of Camp Dork

 So, what are you reading?

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

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“Reading the Middle Grade Mind”

Have you ever tried to steer one of your favorite kids toward one of your favorite books? You’re in eager enthusiasm mode. “Hey, you are going to LOVE this book!”

Then the kid rears back, looks like you asked him to drink a glass of hot chalk, gives you that look, and says, “Uh, thanks, but I don’t think so.”

Just like adults, kids pick books for their own reasons. And timing is everything. One week a reader might feel like something light that reflects familiar problems like, The Mother Daughter Book Club series; the next week he or she might relish the challenges of Wonder or maybe a visit to a whole to universe in The Lightning Thief or something as wacky as one of the Wimpy Kid books. It all depends on mood, just like it does with you and me. Or stress level. Or time availability. I’ve seen a 9-year old read and enjoy a Babysitter Club book – standard 3rd grade level reading—during a school week, and Wonderstruck— 5thgrade level reading–on her vacation. Makes sense. You and I don’t read Dostoevsky when we barely have time for lunch. Middle grade readers thrive on a huge variety of choice. Which is lucky, since as authors, we are just as eclectic as our young readers!

That said, I am sure there are those of us who try to shake loose a few practical thoughts before we set pen to paper to write our deathless prose. No doubt, in addition to prayer, you’ve tried to psyche out just where that sweet spot in middle grade literature is. Sure, there are trends and the Goodreads lists and I’m sure there are some left-brain writers out there who can successfully write to the formula. But since I’ve always favored on-the-spot research, I thought I’d go directly to the source: my sixth grade consultants: Sarah, Haley, Carolyn, Mia and Emily. “What have you been reading lately?” I asked them. These are just a few samples of the many titles they sent me:

  • Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library by Chris Grabenstein
  • I Will Always Write Back:  How One Letter Changed Two Lives by Martin Ganda
  • The Agony and the Ecstasy by Irving Stone.
  • The Port Chicago 50 by Steve Sheinkin
  • School of Charm by Lisa Ann Scott
  • Black Beauty by Anna Sewall
  • Little Women by Louisa Mae Alcott
  • Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  • Hope is a Ferris Wheel by Robin Herrera
  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  • Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  • The Egypt Game by Zilpha Keatley Snyder

Sure, it’s a girls list; not much blood and guts there but look at the variety. From dystopia to Victoriana to the serious issues of an adolescent with a disability to pure escapism. Irving Stone, no less! Remarkable that reading tastes could vary so widely among such friends from the same school in the same grade with such similar backgrounds. My point being, that predicting subject matter that will appeal to every middle grader is a losing proposition.

Picture this—and if you’ve taken your children or your students to the library, you’ve seen it many times. A middle grader sitting on the floor between the stacks taking out book after book off the shelf, looking at it very briefly, and then returning it to that empty slot among the other books. Those poor, forlorn, rejected books. Someone put his or her heart and soul into writing that book! What was wrong with it! Well, it just didn’t suit, that’s all. For reasons we, as onlookers (or the unfortunate author of said rejected volume) will never know. My conclusion: short of writing a tome on the love life of ants, I might as well forget trying to guess what will suit the middle grade reader and suit myself instead.

At the same time—trying with some difficulty to recall my past life as a lit. major—I tryed to find the commonalities in the lists of books my sixth graders sent me. It wasn’t in the eras, the settings or the subject matter. They varied from Hogwarts, to Ghana, to the rural South, to a dystopian future, to small town USA, to ancient Rome.  Lots of variety there and choice in those areas can be a matter of cover art, flap blurb or momentary whim. But in the protagonist (Lit. 101 !) I do think young people make a conscious choice to read a book featuring one of two different kinds of protagonists:

  1. A character with whom they can completely identify; someone who shares their sensibilities, their strengths, their weaknesses, and their secret feelings; someone who permits them to sigh in relief, saying, “I am not alone; Someone else feels or behaves that way too.”
    Or
  2. A character with whom they can partially identify, but who is perceived as an individual to emulate; someone with qualities to admire, or aspire to, even if those qualities are as basic as patience, or self-assurance, or courage rather than the ability to fly or fight dragons.

It might be simplistic to say that the former is featured in reading that requires a little less concentration than the latter. I’m sure there are examples either way. But the best authors show us well rounded characters who evolve and change in both cases. What a privilege it is to read the work of the many wonderful authors of middle grade fiction who make their characters come alive for us. I see my young friends absorbing Palacio’s Auggie, Hodgson Burnett’s Sara Crewe, Pullman’s Lyra, Selznick’s Ben and Rose; Riordan’s Percy, and Lowry’s Jonas and I think, “These characters are becoming part of who my young friends are.” How could they not?

I too feel as though I too have been influenced by the thousands of fictional characters that have filled me up over the years. A good number have come from middle grade books. Many from young adult books. One memorable one was the picture book that inspired my own middle grade novel, The Unintended Runaways, with its lively painting of a gypsy wagon and the carefree little girl who lived in it.

The tale that formed around that picture was the story I wanted to tell. I fought it. I’d been in marketing and public relations and I knew historical fiction was emphatically NOT in vogue. Would anyone read it? Newsletters and conferences told me I would never sell it.  “Write it anyway,” I told myself. I already had visions of the beautiful blue wagon and the big shire horse trotting down the lovely rural roads of mid-19th century England. market.

“Don’t be an idiot,” I argued back. “You’re a journalist. You wrote a history book. Get out there and write something that’ll sell. How about an academy for shapeshifters? A middle school mafia? An underground society ruled by 12-year olds? You can do it! Get with the program!”

“Yeah,” said my better self. “And it will suck, big time and you will hate every minute of it. This is 40,000 words we’re talking about.”

So I did it my way. I wrote my historical novel about 19th century young people. Unfashionable as my setting might be, I knew today’s middle graders would identify with the larger themes of justice, freedom, and family. And I hoped they would fall in love with my characters just as I did.

Thus The Unintended Runaways came into being. My sixth grade consultants – who were very generous early readers!—say they like it. (They kind of have to say that.) But the proof will be in the sales figures. Because as a general rule……

There’s just no reading the middle grade mind.

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Links:

Website:  www.theunintendedrunaways.com

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unintended Runaways

Summary: For a girl who loved adventure, twelve-year old Lia Leonides had the perfect life. Every summer, she and her grandfather traveled the rural roads of England in their gypsy wagon, stopping at fairs and selling horse brasses along the way. It was exactly the life Lia wanted, until the day a mysterious letter arrived. Lia’s grandfather warned her not to get her hopes up, but lifelong dreams are hard to ignore. Lia’s father was alive and looking for her. But when her grandfather suddenly passes away, Lia is sent to work as a servant in an orphanage and is left with a choice that she never wanted to make: let the world decide her future for her, or run away and decide it for herself? Lia, with the help of her beloved pets and some unexpected friends, must take her gypsy wagon south on a harrowing journey before her father disappears forever. A persistent sheriff and the constant threat of misfortune won’t make the trip easy, but Lia and her friends don’t plan to let anything stop them from forging their own destinies.

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sally b-p

About the Author: Sally Barlow-Perez openly admits that books have taken over a good chunk of her life. She gobbles down two or three library books a week, ranging in genre from young adult, to middle grade, to fantasy, to mystery. She tries to balance her book obsession with writing, hiking, and hanging out with the young people who inspire her. But no matter how hard she tries, she always comes back to books. As a fiction writer, Sally’s focus is curiosity. “Curiosity is a great excuse for writing, as well as for reading,” she says. “Even when I finish a book, I still wonder what the characters are doing!” Sally makes her life in Palo Alto, California. She has two grown sons, whom she believes to be her greatest contribution to mankind. The Unintended Runaways is her first middle-grade novel. More information is available at www.theunintendedrunaways.com.

Thank you Sally for this insightful guest post!

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cody and the mysteries of the

Cody and the Mysteries of the Universe
Author: Tricia Springstubb
Illustrator: Eliza Wheeler
Published April 12th, 2016 by Candlewick Press

 Goodreads Summary: Not everything turns out to be as it first appears when Cody and her best friend, Spencer, navigate a neighborhood mystery and the start of a new school year.

Cody’s best friend, Spencer, and his parents are moving in with his grandmother right around the corner, and Cody can’t wait. For one thing, Cody needs Spencer to help solve the mystery of the never-seen Mr. Meen, who lives on the other side of the porch with a skull-and-crossbones sign in the window and an extermination truck out front. How’s Cody to know that a yellow jacket would sting her, making her scream “Ow! Ow!” just as they start spying? Or that the ominous window sign would change overnight to “Welcome home,” only deepening the mystery? In this second adventure, Spencer’s new-school jitters, an unexpected bonding with a teacher over Mozart, and turf-claiming kids next door with a reason for acting out are all part of Cody’s experiences as summer shifts into a new year at school.

My Review: I loved this one as much as the first one. (P.S. You don’t have to read the first one to enjoy this one, but they are both so good you should read both.) What I love most about the books is that Cody and Spencer and their families and the secondary characters are just so flawed and familiar and real. What I love second most about the book is how Tricia Springstubb writes. It is lyrical yet to the point. Beautiful yet not fluffy. See my example below. What I love third most about the book is the humor. Cody is one funny young lady!

Cody’s story this time revolves around two things: Spencer moving nearby and things not going as expected and the mystery behind the Meens, the bullying girls who live next to Spencer. Springstubb navigates both of these topics (bullying and friendship) with ease along with other minor topics like family and identity which makes Cody’s story perfect for all young readers because they will either relate or be able to use the story to help them in the future.

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: Cody’s story represents so many different types of people: different races, different families, different situations, different popularity, different talents, etc., so her stories are perfect for reading aloud to a class/child.

It could also be used as a mentor text for language during a writing workshop’s narrative unit.

Discussion Questions: What does Cody mean by the baton of love?; Is it ever okay to fight?; Why does Payton’s behavior affect Wyatt so much?; How did Cody expect Spencer being at her school to be? How did it end up?

Flagged Passages: “He [Spencer] was getting ready to practice his violin. Mom and Cody sat down to listen. The song he played was called ‘Go Tell Aunt Rhody.’ The music was complicated. Was it sad? Was it happy? Could it be both at the same time? Cody decided it was perfect night-before-school music. All the while he played, her hand un-itched.” (p. 32)

Read This If You Loved: Cody and the Fountain of Happiness by Tricia Springstubb, The Trouble with Ants by Claudia Mills, Marty McGuire series by Kate Messner, Eleanor series by Julie Sternberg, Lola series by Christine Pakkala, The Top-Secret Diary of Cecile Valentine by Julie Sternberg

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**Thank you to Candlewick for providing a copy for review!!**

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curiosity house

Curiosity House: The Screaming Statue
Authors: Lauren Oliver and H. C. Chester
Anticipated Publication: May 3, 2016! by HarperCollins

Summary: Four orphans with extraordinary abilities and questionable pasts—Pippa, Sam, Thomas, and Max—are happy to be out of harm’s way now that the notorious villain Nicholas Rattigan is halfway across the country in Chicago. But unfortunately their home, Dumfreys’s Dime Museum of Freaks, Oddities, and Wonders, is in danger of closing its doors forever.

But their troubles only get worse. The four friends are shocked when their beloved friend, famous sculptor Siegfried Eckleberger, is murdered. As they investigate, they find clues that his death may be tied to the murder of a rich and powerful New York heiress, as well as to their own pasts.

In this second book in the exceptional Curiosity House series by bestselling author Lauren Oliver and shadowy recluse H. C. Chester, the four extraordinary children must avenge their friend’s death, try to save their home, and unravel the secrets of their past . . . before their past unravels them.

My Review: I actually read the second book in the series before the first, and I had so much fun reading both! The murder mystery kept me guessing throughout the series, and I imagine both middle grade readers and readers of all ages will have great fun with this book! The world of this book feels like it is set about one hundred years ago, so I enjoyed reading sections aloud to my son. We talked with him about “freak shows” and their purpose and existence. He is very young, so the conversation did not get very critical, but I imagine that classroom teachers would have excellent discussions with students about these topics. Each of the characters is very different from the others, which made reading this book so enjoyable. What I enjoyed most about the book (and series) is its accessibility. While the freak show aspect is an element of our past, the book feels like it is set right in this moment, and this is what makes it such an engaging book for readers!

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: This series is a creative lesson gold mine for teachers. How neat would it be to print pictures from the museum and post them around the room? Students could walk around the room and be inspired to write their own fiction. Then, they might share stories and see how different their perspectives might be. This could lead to conversations about author’s craft and outside inspiration as a writing source.

Learn More about The Curiosity House:
The Book Website, which includes School Resources!:  http://www.thecuriosityhouse.com/
Read More about Authors Lauren Oliver and H. C. Chester: http://www.thecuriosityhouse.com/authors.php
Downloadable Character Buttons!

Discussion Questions: Which character was your favorite? What characteristics made the character most interesting to you? How do others respond to this character?; How do you imagine Lauren and H. C. worked together on this project? (Hint: After guessing, take a peek at the interview questions below.); Why might author collaborations be so valuable?

Flagged Passage: “It was only eleven o’clock in the morning and already topping ninety degrees in New York City. The street outside of Dumfrey’s Dime Museum of Freaks, Oddities, and Wonders was as still as a painting.”

**Please note that this passage is from an advanced reader copy and will potentially change with publication.**

Read This Series If You Loved: Wonder Show by Hannah Barnaby, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs, Circus Mirandus by Cassie Beasley, A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd, Mechanical Mind of John Coggin by Elinor Teele, Big Fish by Daniel Wallace, Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

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Interview with Lauren Oliver and H.C. Chester!
Oliver and Chester

What does your writing process look like? Is it mainly collaborative in nature, or do you work alone?

HCC: My working relationship with Ms. Oliver represents what I regard as the ideal collaborative arrangement.  I permit her access to my unique collection of rare and extraordinary artifacts–as well as giving her the invaluable benefit of my encyclopedic knowledge of all things related to the strange and arcane–and she does all the work.

What have you learned from each other while writing these books?

HCC: I have learned that MS. Oliver possesses what can only be termed bananaphobia.  My discovery of this strange phenomenon occurred when I invited her to join Trudy and myself for lunch during one of her–Ms. Oliver’s–research trips to my private museum and made the error of ending  the meal with what I believed would be a delicious dessert of canned fruit cocktail adorned with hand-cut banana slices.  I will spare you a description of the scene that ensued. Let me only say that Trudy was so traumatized that it took her an unusually long span of nearly fifteen minutes to finish off her dish of fruit cocktail.

Lauren, how has writing this series been different from writing your other texts, which explore a much different genre? Has the intended audience affected your writing process in any way?

LO: I actually have two other middle grade books, Liesl and Po, and The Spindlers, so writing for a younger audience wasn’t unfamiliar to me. I really love it, because it gives me a chance to explore my humorous side. And I love how sheerly inventive and, for lack of a better word, kooky you can be with a younger audience.

H.C., what have you learned from this writing process? Has it affected the ways you look at the museum?

HCC: I have learned that the most satisfactory writing process is one in which someone else does all the work.  As for your second question, my answer is: not really.

Interview with the character, Phoebe the Fat Lady:
Phoebe

Weighing in at half a ton, Phoebe is tremendously proud of her size and keeps up a rigorous diet regimen that includes toast soaked in bacon fat and whole sticks of butter. The scariest day of her life was when she discovered, that due to the flu, she had lost ten pounds.

Since you’ve left, what adventures have you embarked on? Who do you miss most?

Phoebe: Hugo and I have traveled all over Europe, where we’ve seen things that are truly freakish! Do you know that in France, snails are a delicacy?

Have you maintained the same weight? How has life been for you, in general?

Phoebe: Oh, certainly not! That is one of the strongest misconceptions people have about my weight–that I do not have to work, every day, to maintain my fantastic enormity. But in fact as a child I could barely be considered plump! In order to maintain my beautiful physique, I follow a strict diet of twenty-six meals a day and restrict my exercise to less than one hundred meters.

Will we see you again?

Phoebe: Never say never!

**Thank you to Natasha Ochshorn and Lauren Oliver for providing an advanced copy for review!**

Be sure to visit the other great blogs on this blog tour! Before us was: http://www.literaryhoots.com and coming up next is: http://www.memyshelfandi.com!

 RickiSig

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NFPB2016

Nonfiction Wednesday

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday is hosted by Kid Lit Frenzy and was started to help promote the reading of nonfiction texts. Most Wednesdays, we will be participating and will review a nonfiction text (though it may not always be a picture book).
Be sure to visit Kid Lit Frenzy and see what other nonfiction books are shared this week!

animal planet 2

Polar Animals

animal planet 1

Ocean Animals

Animal Planet
Published March 1st, 2016 by Animal Planet

Polar Animals Summary: With more than 200 gorgeous animal photos of penguins, polar bears, sea lions, walruses, reindeer and others, Animal Planet Polar Animals is a fun, habitat-by-habitat guide that provides kids in the first years of schooling with the perfect bite-sized view of their favorite animals living in both polar climates. Arranged thematically with focus on animal behavior and family relationships, young readers will explore sections about animal bodies, baby animals, food, play time, conservation, and more. Special book features designed for this age group include Quick Bites sidebars with cool animal facts, simple infographics, and illustrated maps of the coldest places on Earth.

Ocean Animals Summary: With more than 200 gorgeous animal photos of sharks, whales, clown fish, jelly fish, dolphins, and others, Animal Planet Ocean Animals is a fun, habitat-by-habitat guide that provides kids in the first years of schooling with the perfect bite-sized view of their favorite ocean-dwelling animals. Arranged thematically with focus on animal behavior and family relationships, young readers will explore sections about animal bodies, baby animals, food, play time, conservation and more. Special book features designed for this age group include Quick Bites sidebars with cool animal facts, simple infographics, and illustrated maps of Earth’s watery environments.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit Animal Planet’s R.O.A.R. (Reach Out. Act. Respond.) project which partners with leading animal organization to make the world a better place for domestic and wild animals.

Kellee’s Review: Like National Geographic nonfiction books for kids, Animal Planet’s books have some of the most stunning photographs of animals that I’ve ever seen. They take the reader to the animals’ home and shows the reader the ins and outs of the animal and how and where they live.   

Ricki’s Review: My toddler adores these books. My husband was watching him when I started this post, and he said, “Henry have those! Henry have those!” They are intended for an older audience, but that doesn’t stop him. The pictures are gorgeous and there is so much to learn. Each page is brimming with facts! These are great books for readers of all ages.

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: The Animal Bites series uses colorful tabs and other text features to organize the information throughout the book. The tabs are: Where They Live, How They Live, Vista (awesome photos that show the places animals live), Big Data, Animal Gallery, Living/working, Conservation, and specific animal tabs. They also have Just Like Mes thrown throughout the book showing how the animals are similar to humans. The way the book is set up is perfect to discussing biology and zoology. While you use these books in science, you can do comparisons/contrasts and text features in language arts, and find the animals’ habitats in geography. These are perfect books for cross-curricular lessons and inquiry projects.

Activities Created by Time Inc.: 

ocean activitiespolar activities

Ocean and Polar Animals Activity Sheets PDF

Discussion Questions: What other Animal Bites books would you like to see?; What are some examples of ways that some animals are like us?; Which animal that you learned about is the best at camouflaging? Fastest? Best predator? etc.; What text features does the author use to help you understand the text?; How did the author structure the text?; What are the differences/similarities of some of the animals within the books?

We Flagged: 

ocean poster polar poster

Ocean and Polar Animals Posters PDF

Read This If You Loved: National Geographic nonfiction texts, Seymour Simon animal texts, Extreme Ocean Records by Seymour Simon 

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top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Bookworm Delights

These are some of our favorite book/reading things!

Ricki

1. When someone raves about a book I recommended to him/her

Recommending books is very hard because sometimes books hit people in different ways. I feel a sense of relief when a book affects a person in the way I predict!

2. Finding a hidden gem

I often find myself reading books that other bloggers and friends recommend. Further, I try to stay caught up on my favorite authors. But sometimes, I pull that random book off of my shelf, and it shocks me. I am always excited when that book is an ARC because I am able to talk it up before its publication.

3. When 11pm hits, and my work for the day is done, and I reach my reading reward time

Sometimes, this reading reward time extends well into the morning hours!

4. Meeting authors

When I meet an author, and s/he turns out to be a wonderful human being, it just makes the world feel warmer and brighter. I find that almost all YA authors are incredible human beings.

5. Knocking a book off of my book bucket list

Sometimes I go a long time, promising myself I will get to a certain book. When I finish it (and especially if it is very good), I feel very accomplished. As long as I don’t write this list down, it feels manageable in a lifetime. 😉

Kellee

1. When my prediction is correct (or really wrong)!

I love when my prediction is correct, but I also love when a book tricks me!

2. When I find the book title in the story

I get so excited and usually tab it! I love figuring out how the title is chosen.

3. Reading alone at a park or in Starbucks or in bed

Even though I am outgoing, I am an introvert, so this is one of my favorite things in the world.

4. Helping kids find books they really love

This is also one of my favorite things in the world. I love helping kids find a book they truly love. It makes me feel like I have changed their life.

5. When a book makes me cry or laugh out loud

There are books that make others cry/laugh out loud that make me sad or I find humorous, but it is only pretty special books that make me cry or laugh out loud.

What delights you the most? 

RickiSig and Signature

 

IMWAYR 2015 logo

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journeys and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Kellee and Jen, of Teach Mentor Texts, decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

CONGRATULATIONS
BRENDA
FOR WINNING A COPY OF THE MECHANICAL MIND OF JOHN COGGIN!

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Last Week’s Posts

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

top ten tuesday 31 ways to change gaia warriors

teeny tiny toad balthazar

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Tuesday: Books That Will Make You Want to Make a Difference

Wednesday: Earth Day Reads: Gaia Warriors by Nicola Davis & 31 Ways to Change the World by 4,386 Children, We Are What We Do ©, and YOU!

Thursday: Teeny Tiny Toady by Jill Esbaum

Friday: Future Problem Solvers: Kellee’s FPS Journey (so-far)

Sunday: Author Guest Post!: “Possible Impossibilities: Magic and the Middle-Grade Reader” by I.J. Brindle, author of Balthazar Fabuloso in the Lair of the Humbugs

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 Last Week’s Journeys
Kellee

This week was not a very successful reading week. I read every day but not for as long as I wanted to, so I just didn’t finish anything. I did go to see Steve Martin and Martin Short though! If you have a chance, don’t miss it!

Ricki

I’ve finished most of the coursework for my classes, so my pleasure reading is much more open now! Phew! Once I get the Spring grading done, I will feel even more accomplished!

Nest

The Nest by Kenneth Oppel was a creepy book. I loved every minute of it and highly recommend it!

All American Boys

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely. What a fabulous book. I am so glad that it is so well-loved by other readers. I listened to the audio, and it smacked me in the face. I’ll be adopting this book for curriculum.

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This Week’s Expeditions
Kellee

I’m currently reading:

camp rolling hills

Camp Rolling Hills by Stacy Davidowitz which is a drama-filled summer camp story.

war that saved
I’m also listening to The War that Saved my Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley which I wish I could listen to always.

My plan this week is to finish Camp Rolling Hills and hopefully its sequel also. Happy reading this week!

Ricki 

Invisible Fault Lines

I’ve been savoring Invisible Fault Lines by Kristen-Paige Madonia. I look forward to reviewing it next week. It’s excellent.

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Upcoming Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday animal planet 1 animal planet 2

screaming statue cody and the mysteries of the unintended Runaways

Tuesday: Bookworm Delights

Wednesday: Animal Planet’s Ocean Animals and Polar Animals

Thursday: Blog Tour, Authors Interview, Character Q&A, and Review!: Curiousity House: The Screaming Statue by Lauren Oliver and H.C. Chester

Friday: Cody and the Mysteries of the Universe by Tricia Sprinstubb

Sunday: Author Guest Post! “Reading the Middle Grade Mind” by Sally Barlow-Perez, Author of The Unintended Runaways

 So, what are you reading?

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

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