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All the Places We Call Home
Author: Patrice Gopo
Illustrator: Jenin Mohammed
Published June 14th, 2022 by Worthy Kids

Summary: Fall in love with this lyrically written and lushly illustrated exploration of identity and home that celebrates all the places and people who make us who we are.

“And where shall we go?” Mama asks as she tucks me in.

“South Africa. Where I was born.”

My answer summons Mama’s stories, stories that send us soaring back in time to when I was a baby. Out my window. Down my street. Across water. Across continents.

Where do you come from? Where does your family come from? For many children, the answers to these questions can transform a conversation into a journey around the globe.

In her first picture book, author Patrice Gopo illuminates how family stories help shape children, help form their identity, and help connect them with the broader world. Her lyrical language, paired with Jenin Mohammed’s richly textured artwork, creates a beautiful, stirring portrait of a child’s deep ties to cultures and communities beyond where she lays her head to sleep.

Ultimately, this story speaks a truth that all children need to hear: The places we come from are part of us, even if we can’t always be near them. All the Places We Call Home is a quiet triumph that encourages an awakening to our own stories and to the stories of those around us.

About the Creators: 

Patrice Gopo is the child of Jamaican immigrants and was born and raised in Anchorage, Alaska. She is an award-winning essayist and the author of All the Colors We Will See: Reflections on Barriers, Brokenness, and Finding Our Way (a Fall 2018 Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection). Her ties to Jamaica and other parts of the world sparked her early desire to travel to the cities and countries she traced on a globe. In time, as she began writing about her experiences, Patrice became interested in how places contribute to the people we become. Ultimately, she hopes her stories celebrate the beauty of living a multifaceted life. Patrice lives with her family in North Carolina—a place she considers another home. All the Places We Call Home is her first picture book.

Winner of the SCBWI 2020 Summer Showcase Award, artist Jenin Mohammed moved into children’s illustration after working to gain entry into storyboarding for television. Just as her dream studio job appeared on the horizon, Jenin realized that her true love for story lay in children’s illustration. Her work uses dynamic shapes and perspective with a layering technique to create a tissue-paper-collage-meets-painterly look. Born and raised in Florida, Jenin grew up in an African American/Caribbean household, providing a personal connection to Patrice’s story.

Review and Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: This book is a beautiful look at family history and culture. It celebrates oral tradition through story and memories, a sense of belonging through place, and a look at one family’s story. The prose is lyrical and calming and the illustrations are vibrant and expressive–it will make a great read aloud for all and a deep dive book for classrooms!

This book would be a great mentor text for writing a family history or visiting the world through memories in another way. Students can connect with their families and friend through the places they call home and create their own pathway around the globe.

Discussion Questions: 

  • Where are your homes?
  • Why does learning about where someone is from help tell their story?
  • Even if not through family, how else could you “travel” the globe through memories?
  • Where would you like to visit if you could?
  • What tradition do you have at bedtime?
  • What do you think the author’s purpose of the story was?
  • Why does the young girl view America, South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Jamaica all as her homes?

Flagged Passages: 

Read This If You Love: Bedtime stories, Multigenerational stories, Stories about family history

Recommended For: 

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**Thank you to Nicole Banholzer PR for providing copies for review!**

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

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Tuesday: Lettuce Get in Trouble by Linda Kuo, illustrated by Mariana Rio

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

Tricked by Jen CalonitaSwitched by Jen CalonitaWished by Jen CalonitaClose Encounters of the Nerd Kind by Kim Harrington

  • Tricked, Switched, & Wished (Fairy Tale Reform School #3, 4, & 5) by Jen Calonita: Still really enjoying this fractured fairy tale series. Fans of Whatever After and Land of Stories are going to love it–make sure you grab it for your fairy tale fans! I’m excited to get to the finale.
  • Close Encounters of the Nerd Kind (Gamer Squad #2) by Kim Harrington: Trent and I are listening to this series, and I really liked the first one, but I loved the second one. Smart how Harrington twisted up the storyline, and now that we know the characters, we are even more invested. Onto the last one!

The Cobalt Prince by Mark  SiegelThe Red Maze by Mark  SiegelThe Amber Anthem by Mark  Siegel

  • The Cobalt PrinceThe Red Mazeand The Amber Anthem (5 Worlds #2, 3, & 4) by Mark Siegel & Alexis Seigel, illustrated by Xanthe Bouma, Matt Rockefeller, & Boya Sun: I am so glad that Trent talked me into rereading the first three books in this series and finishing up the whole thing. It is so epic! If you do not have this series yet for your graphic novel and fantasy fans, I highly recommend it!

I also went on a picture book read streak, so I have quite a few to share!

My Pet Feet by Josh FunkThere's a Unicorn in Your Book by Tom    FletcherOnly One by Deborah HopkinsonThe Path by Bob StaakeJust Like Jesse Owens by Andrew     Young

  • My Pet Feet by Josh Funk, illustrated by Billy Yong: Josh Funk is just so darn clever, and this picture book is unlike any by him or anyone else. I love it so much, and I cannot wait for everyone to have fun with this book!
  • There’s a Unicorn in Your Book by Tom Fletcher, illustrated by Greg Abbott: We have other books in this series, so Trent was so excited to see this new one. Fletcher and Abbott do a good job at keeping the series similar yet adding in little twists to make each book unique.
  • Only One by Deborah Hopkinson, illustrated by Chuck Groenink: A beautiful message about our beautiful Earth. (Ricki’s review)
  • The Patby Bob Staake: This book is lyrically beautiful, the illustrations are so calm yet expressive, and it is in 2nd person! It also is a wonderful introduction to to extended metaphors (path = life).
  • Just Like Jesse Owen by Andrew Young & Paula Young Shelton, illustrated by Gordon C. James: I loved this transfer of oral history from father to daughter to us. It is meant to be read out loud and Gordon C. James brought the history to life through his (as always) brilliancy.

I'm Growing Great by Mechal Renee RoeBlast Off! by Suzanne SladeBuild! by Red Nose StudioOnce Upon a Forest by Pam FongSunflower Sisters by Monika Singh Gangotra

  • I’m Growing Great by Mechal Renee Roe: Illustrations 5 stars! I LOVE THEM! The text was so positive though it just didn’t flow as well as I’d like, and I was annoyed by the lower case “i” throughout. It will definitely will be as popular as Happy Hair and Cool Cuts.
  • Blast Off: How Mary Sherman Morgan Fueled America into Space by Suzanne Slade, illustrated by Sally W. Comport: It makes me both sad and excited when I learn about a new marginalized person from history that changed our world yet has not had the opportunity to be known. Mary Sherman was the first female rocket scientist and changed the history of her profession. I am so glad I got to learn about her in this beautiful book.
  • Build! by Red Nose Studio: Oh man, construction loving young kids are going to LOVE this book! And the found object illustrations are so great!
  • Once Upon a Forest by Pam Fong: I can see why Ricki had to review this book. This wordless picture book is so cute, uses color so purposefully, and has a wonderful message. (Ricki’s review)
  • Sunflower Sisters by Monika Singh Gangotra, illustrated by Michaela Dias-Hayes: What beautiful illustrations and message!

Time Capsule by Lauren RednissA Blue Kind of Day by Rachel TomlinsonNot Enough Lollipops by Megan MaynorDarryl's Dream by Darryl DMC McDanielsBlue by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond

  • Time Capsule by Lauren Redniss: Great back matter to add onto the sparse text around a time capsule. Use as a read aloud and guide to making a time capsule!
  • A Blue Kind of Day by Rachel Tomlinson, illustrated by Tori-Jay Mordey: This book 💙 I was a child with depression (and now an adult with depression), and this book is something I wish had existed so many years ago because I would have found myself in it. I think this book is going to change lives.
  • Not Enough Lollipops by Megan Maynor, illustrated Micah Player: A great lesson in cooperation and generosity using items that students will understand.
  • Darryl’s Dream by Darryl DMC McDaniels, illustrated by Tristan Tait: I loved reading DMC’s story. It is about passion and following what you love to succeed. And it is told in a fun way with colorful illustrations that fit the book perfectly!
  • Blue: A History of the Color as Deep as the Sea and as Wide as the Sky by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond, illustrated Daniel Minter: What. A. Beautiful. Book! I didn’t know I needed a history of a color, but I am so glad it exists! And the back matter is just an awesome addition.

How to Hear the Universe by Patricia ValdezPeople Are Wild by Margaux MeganckMore Than Peach by Bellen WoodardWhere's My Cat by Seymour ChwastI'd Like to Be the Window for a Wise Old Dog by Philip C. Stead

  • How to Hear the Universe: Gaby González and the Search for Einstein’s Ripples in Space-Time by Patricia Valdez, illustrated by Sara Palacios: The math and science within this book is so deep; however, I loved learning about the connection between Einstein and González and modern technology. Another amazing female scientist that hopefully more people will know about now!
  • People are Wild by Margaux Meganck: I am a huge fan of this twist on perspective. Great mentor text to talk about point of view and perspective.
  • More Than Peach by Bellen Woodard, illustrated by Fanny Liem: I loved learning about the first Crayon activist!
  • Where’s My Cat? by Seymour Chwast: This book seems simple, but it is so much more than meets the eye, specifically if used in an art class. And it is silly—kids will love it!
  • I’d Like to Be the Window for a Wise Old Dog by Philip C. Stead: I’m a fan of this Stead book! It’ll be an amazing mentor text to imitate the poetic style and also to get students thinking creatively. And always with beautiful illustrations.

With Lots of Love by Jenny Torres SanchezThis Is the Tree We Planted by Kate McMullanMy Shadow Is Purple by Scott StuartElefantastic! by Jane Yolen

  • With Lots of Love by Jenny Torres Sanchez, illustrated by Andres Ceolin: What a beautiful story about a love between a granddaughter and her grandmother! Readers will also connect with Rocio’s moving and finding home.
  • This is the Tree We Planted by Kate McMullan, illustrated by Alison Friend: Play on The House That Jack Built & would be a good mentor text for students to make their own. I do wish there had been back matter to take it all to the next level.
  • My Shadow is Purple by Scott Stuart: Yes! Challenge those gender roles/norms/stereotypes!!!! I love this book for now!
  • Elefantastic!: A Story of Magic in 5 Acts: Light Verse on a Heavy Subject by Jane Yolen, illustrated by Brett Helquist: I love Jane Yolen’s writing, and this one has great word play that I can admire; however, I am very anti adopting wild animals and although this book ends with the elephant going to a sanctuary, I think it misses the mark of what it could be when it comes to a lesson about wild animals and sanctuaries and habitats. There just needed to be more.

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2022 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

These three recent/upcoming releases are all fantastic.

Sabina Hahn’s Pineapple Princess is about a girl who demands to be princess over her kingdom. She makes a pineapple hat, but her subjects (the flies) are NOT cooperating or listening to her.

School Is Wherever I Am by Ellie Peterson reinforces the important message that school is everywhere—not just inside a building with “school” on the sign. I liked this book a lot, and it is a great message to children (and adults!).

Blue Baboon Finds Her Tune is the newest publication by the duo who wrote Snatchabook (Helen Docherty and Thomas Docherty). It’s about a baboon who is eager to play with friends, but a monsoon threatens to ruin her fun. There are great rhymes in this book, and it is a great read aloud!

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Kellee

Drifters5 Worlds Book 5: The Emerald GateCursed (Fairy Tale Reform School, #6)App of the Living Dead (Gamer Squad #3)

  • Reading: Drifters by Kevin Emerson & 5 Worlds: The Emerald Gate by Mark Siegel & Alexis Seigel
  • Listening to: Cursed by Jen Calonita & (with Trent) Gamer Squad: App of the Living Dead by Kim Harrington

Ricki

I am almost done listening to All My Rage by Sabaa Tahir.

I have 50 pages left of Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts by Rebecca Hall. I can’t bring myself to finish it because then it will be over. So it travels with me around the house, and I read a couple of pages at a time. Does anyone else do this with books that are really, really good?

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Tuesday: All the Places we Call Home by Patrice Gopo, Illustrated by Jenin Mohammed

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Lettuce Get In Trouble
Author: Linda Kuo
Illustrator: Mariana Rio
Co-Authors: Cynthia Benjamin & Paula Rees
Published May 17th, 2022 by Center for Design Books

Summary: Sara Little Turnbull was a designer, an observer, a mentor, and not afraid to cause a little trouble while making the world a better place. As a global traveler, she made connections between people and found wonder in the everyday objects they hold dear.

As a very petite female designer in the world of large men, Sara used her unique perspective and curiosity to design a wide range of revolutionary products–from facemasks to cookware to astronaut suits–and to encourage others to see the world through new eyes. Sara was a mentor to designers of all ages and in Lettuce Get in Trouble, she helps children understand the basics of design: observing the world around them, asking questions, and trying out new things. One day, the Ministry of Food asks Sara Little to convince the children to eat more vegetables. Instead of offering a stern lecture, however, Sara Little brings her young friends to her Little Lab to explore the colors and shapes of food and why we eat anything at all. Together they design a grand event, inviting children to gather, play, and design tasty new creations.

Sara Little Trouble Maker Series Information: New Children’s Picture Book Series Introduces Young Readers to the Basics of Design by asking “Why?”

Lettuce Get in Trouble is the first volume in the Sara Little Trouble Maker series from Center for Design Books—a children’s picture book that teaches the basics of design in a way that is easy for young readers to understand. Inspired by a little-known but influential designer, Sara Little, Lettuce Get in Trouble helps children learn to problem-solve by observing the world around them, asking great questions, and trying out new things.

“Sara wears many hats and one tiny upside-down clock on her black turtleneck. She is always asking a lot of questions.”

Why?

In Lettuce Get in Trouble, we meet Sara Little, a troublemaker of the best sort; she asks great questions starting with Why? Sara looks at the world a little differently than other adults—by doing so, interesting problems and the need for design solutions come her way. This first story focuses on Sara’s design influence with new foods and is set in her beloved city of New York. One day, the Ministry of Food asks Sara Little to convince the children to eat more vegetables. Instead of offering a stern lecture, Sara brings her young friends to her Little Lab to explore the colors and shapes of food and why we eat anything at all. Together, they plan a grand event, inviting children from around the world to design fresh, tasty creations. “The children will cook, and we shall allow them to play with their food!” says Sara. Will the leader of the Ministry of Food be happy? Will the children learn to love veggies?

“Good design solves problems and also makes the world more beautiful and fun.”

Through experimentation, discovery, and planning, Sara teaches children that “good design solves problems and also makes the world more beautiful and fun.” In Lettuce Get in Trouble, the children—and designers of all ages—learn to make their world a better place by being curious, ‘taking the time to see’ and not being afraid to cause a little trouble.

“When you take the time to see, the wonders become commonplace, and the commonplace become wonders.”

About the Real Little Sara: Sara Little (1917-2015) was a designer, teacher, and observer not afraid to cause a little trouble while developing innovative solutions to fulfill our basic needs. As a global traveler, she made connections between people and found wonder in the everyday objects, tools, and rituals their cultures hold dear. As a very petite female designer in the world of large men, Sara used her unique perspective and curiosity to design a wide range of revolutionary products—from medical masks which inspired the N95 to cookware to astronaut’s spacesuits—and encouraged others to see the world through new eyes. This first story reflects Sara’s influence on the American lifestyle by promoting casual dining with buffets and finger foods.

About the Creators: 

Linda Kuo designs products for children and loves creative storytelling. She has a BFA from Parsons School of Design in New York and an MFA from Stanford University, where Sara Little mentored her. Sara often said, “Design is to create order.” Linda practices Sara’s teaching in all her projects as the Design Director at Pottery Barn Kids & Teen, headquartered in San Francisco, and serves as a board member of the Center for Design.

Mariana Rio is an award-winning illustrator and educator in Porto, Portugal. She graduated in Communication Design from the Faculty of Fine Arts, University of Porto. With over a decade of experience, she is happy to spend her days creating characters and visual narratives for publishing houses and institutions worldwide. Her illustrations have been featured in the Bologna Children’s Book Fair exhibitions. Mariana is always eager to learn, and she found Sara Little’s legacy a huge inspiration. Find more at: www.marianario.com

The Sara Little [Turnbull] Center for Design Institute is a non-profit (501c3) in Seattle, WA, with a mission to educate and enhance the public’s knowledge of design and further the education of under served women and girls. Profit from the book series will support that work.

Review: Lettuce Get in Trouble is such a great inquiry book! It shows the importance of asking questions, asking more questions, pushing boundaries, and never letting someone judge you by their assumptions.

I found the collage-esque and colorful illustrations mixed with the multi-format of the picture book just so much fun to read and as unique as its subject. It also has such a quick pace that could have been detrimental but instead kept the reader wanting to move forward to see what Sara is going to tackle next.

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: I think the first thing I would do with this book is start with the WHY and have students come up with their own questions then find answers. Use Sara Little’s inquiry to inspire their own inquiry. There are also other mentor opportunities such as answering Sara’s questions and having students write a letter that they would have written to Sara.

Also, there is so much to learn about Sara Little Turnbull. She changed our world yet is too unknown. Students can use this book/series as a jumping off point to learning about her career and inventions. After reading the book, students could be grouped and each group assigned one of her designs/inventions to research and share.

Learn more about Sara Little at The Center for Design, the Sara Little Troublemaker website, or this Fortune article about her for Women’s History Month.

Discussion Questions: 

  • What did Sara do differently than others at the Ministry of Food?
  • What traits does Sara have that made her such a great designer and thinker?
  • What did Sara’s mom do to help her become the inquisitive thinker she was?
  • What questions do you have like Sara?
  • How did Sara think about food differently than others?
  • Why did the Center for Design decide to start a series inspired by Sara Little?

Flagged Passages: 

Read This If You Love: Nontraditional picture book biographies

Recommended For: 

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**Thank you to Claire McKinney PR for providing a copy for review!**

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

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Tuesday: National Geographic Kids’ Mythical Beasts: 100 Fun Facts About Real Animals and the Myths They Inspire by Stephanie Warren Drimmer & Bling!: 100 Fun Facts About Gems by Emma Carlson Berne

Thursday: Close-Up On War: The Story of Pioneering Photojournalist Catherine Leroy in Vietnam by Mary Cronk Farrell

Sunday: Author Guest Post by Lowey Bundy Sichol, Author of Idea Makers: 15 Fearless Female Entrepreneurs

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

Hello!! Hope everyone is doing well! We’re getting close to the end of the year here; happy almost end of the year to any other educators, too!

As I’ve mentioned, I am not doing long weekly updates each week, so this is one of my weeks off; however, you can always see what I am reading by checking out my 2022 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

Hi! I am reading the proofs for my book this week, so no new reading beyond that to report!

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Tuesday: Lettuce Get in Trouble by Linda Kuo, illustrated by Mariana Rio

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“How to Create a Think Tank in Your Classroom”

It happens every Spring – ideas come to life in elementary and middle schools across the country. The end of the school year is in sight, curriculums are on track, and teachers are given the freedom to incorporate projects that interweave creativity, inventions, and out of the box thinking.

This is also the time of year when my inbox explodes with requests for author visits to help inspire these young minds to consider the world of entrepreneurship. I’ve spoken at “Invention Conventions,” listened to “Inventor Reports,” helped kids “Launch a Business,” and inspired students at “Career Days” – all wonderful ways to young minds thinking about the real world and how their ideas can change the world.

So how can you create a Think Tank in your classroom?

First, read how other people built their businesses.

Reading how others did it is one of the most important teaching strategies in business school so why shouldn’t it work for elementary and middle schools? Called Case Studies, they are the foundation for teaching MBA programs at Harvard, Stanford, Dartmouth, and Northwestern’s business schools. After graduating business school, I created a writing company that composed MBA case studies for some of the top business schools in the world. And it was those case studies that inspired my nonfiction children’s book series, From an Idea to… (LEGO, Nike, Google, Disney) as well as my new book entitled Idea Makers: 15 Fearless Female Entrepreneurs.

Lessons of perseverance, bravery, resilience, and creativity run deep throughout all my children’s books. They help inspire kids to think about their own ideas and teach them the steps it takes to turn an idea into reality.

Next, hold a Brainstorming Session

Most great ideas come from a person’s passion. Think Steve Jobs with computers, Walt Disney with animation, and Milton Hershey with candy. Each of these founders knew their industry inside and out and loved spending every waking minute working on it. Entrepreneurs need to have passion for their idea. So, it’s important that kids really understand who they are and where their passions lie. Here is one of my favorite brainstorming session exercises:

  • Have each student write their name in the middle of a piece of paper and circle it.
  • Next, have them write 4-10 things that is important to them and helps define them. I’ll call these Circles of Passion. This could be a sport, an instrument, a relative, a food they like to cook, a friend, a pet, a toy, a language… you get the point. Now circle each of those words.
  • From those 4-10 circles comes the real idea generation. Each student should think about those words. I mean really think about them. If it’s a sport, for example, what do you love about it, what do you hate about it, what problems are there with the equipment or the field, the uniform or the shoes or their hair when they play it, etc. If the child wrote down a sibling or cousin or grandma, what’s special about them, what do you admire about them, what do they struggle with or what do you help them with? There could be 20 branches coming from one passion and zero coming from another.
  • Looking down at the child’s paper, he or she should tons of words and phrases on their paper. Now have the student ask themselves: Is there a problem in here? Could they solve that problem?

Keep these business concepts in mind

A few ideas should start to pop out now. Hooray! Now it’s time for your students consider some business concepts to see if their idea has legs. We call these the 4 P’s in business school.

  • PRODUCT: What does your product do? What will it look like? What will the packaging look like? Take water, for example. You can find water bottles in plastic, aluminum, and glass. You can find small bottles, tall bottles, skinny bottles, fat bottles. Some water is from spring water, some from Fiji or Iceland, some are just purified tap water.
  • PRICE: How much it would cost to create the product? How much could it sell for? This is a great time to incorporate math into discussions about profit margins.
  • PLACE: Place is another way to say distribution. Where will the product be sold? Some examples include online, Amazon, Walmart, boutique stores, farmer’s market, door-to-door, etc. What are the steps to get the product into each of these options?
  • PROMOTION: How do people find out about the product or service? Examples include : social media, flyers, PR, etc.

Now it’s time to show off these ideas!

Consider holding a pitch day in your classroom or a Shark Tank competition with parent volunteer judges. Another idea is to hold a town fair where all the kids display their idea and parents are invited to visit each business and listen to their pitches.

Good luck and be sure to tag me if you post it online! @LoweySichol

Published March 1st, 2022 by Chicago Review Press

About the Book: Entrepreneurship can change your life—and even the world.

Idea Makers shares the incredible stories of 15 women who changed the world through their entrepreneurship. Author Lowey Bundy Sichol presents five industries that women are leading in recent years: food, fashion and clothing, health and beauty, science and technology, and education.

Jenn Hyman brought couture fashion to everyday women with her idea to Rent the Runway. Morgan DeBaun supports Black journalists through Blavity. And Sandra Oh Lin is inspiring kids everywhere with KiwiCo activity boxes.

Readers learn about how the women featured risked their early careers, gave up their salaries, and sometimes even went against the approval of their families to follow their passions and start their own businesses. Today, these women are modern leaders worth billions of dollars and employing tens of thousands of individuals.

Young women today are embracing innovation and idea making, and the women profiled in Idea Makers will show them how that can change the world.

Praise: 

Idea Makers: 15 Fearless Female Entrepreneurs leads with the notion that in growing the entrepreneurs of the future, representation matters.” —Suzanne Schaefer, Vice President, Bain & Company

“Lowey’s book is written with kids in mind—curious, creative, and ambitious kids.” —Rebecca Burstein, Founder and Principal, Burst Marketing Strategy

“It’s rare to find books that capture the attention of older and young readers alike, but Lowey Sichol has done it again.” —Karen Loggia, Director of Marketing and Communications, Tension Corporation

“A must read for every kid (and adult) who has a crazy idea and big dreams! In Idea Makers, Lowey Sichol tells the inspirational stories of 15 female entrepreneurs who had the vision, passion, and determination to build iconic companies.” —Alexis McLaughlin, CEO, 2020 On-Site

“This book is amazing! It is full of empowering stories that are sure to inspire a new generation of creative thinkers and future entrepreneurs. Readers are going to love it!” —Todd Burleson, School Library Journal 2016 Librarian of the Year

“Informative and inspiring, Idea Makers tells the transformational stories of 15 amazing women entrepreneurs. Lowey Sichol skillfully brings each of those stories to life with lessons of creativity, perseverance and passion.” —Kevin Lane Keller, E.B. Osborn Professor of Marketing, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College

About the Author: Lowey Bundy Sichol (her last name rhymes with pickle) is an award-winning children’s author with an MBA from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. She is a leading expert in teaching business and entrepreneurship to kids. Lowey’s nonfiction series, From an Idea to… is the world’s first business and entrepreneurship book series for kids, and has received a 2020 Best STEM Book, a Junior Library Guild Gold Selection, and a 2020 ILA-CBC Children’s Choices Book, among others. She is also the founder of Kids Idea Tank, the nation’s biggest entrepreneurship competition for kids age 13 and younger. She lives near Chicago, Illinois. Visit her online at www.loweybundysichol.com, https://twitter.com/LoweySichol, and https://www.instagram.com/loweysichol/.

Thank you so much for this amazing post about pushing our students to the next level!

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Close-Up On War: The Story of Pioneering Photojournalist Catherine Leroy in Vietnam
Author: Mary Cronk Farrell
Published March 22, 2022 by Amulet

GoodReads Summary: The incredible story of Catherine Leroy, one of the few woman photographers during the Vietnam War, told by an award-winning journalist and children’s author.

From award-winning journalist and children’s book author Mary Cronk Farrell comes the inspiring and fascinating story of the woman who gave a human face to the Vietnam War. Close-Up on War tells the story of French-born Catherine Leroy, one of the war’s few woman photographers, who documented some of the fiercest fighting in the 20-year conflict. Although she had no formal photographic training and had never traveled more than a few hundred miles from Paris before, Leroy left home at age 21 to travel to Vietnam and document the faces of war. Despite being told that women didn’t belong in a “man’s world,” she was cool under fire, gravitated toward the thickest battles, went along on the soldiers’ slogs through the heat and mud of the jungle, crawled through rice paddies, and became the only official photojournalist to parachute into combat with American soldiers. Leroy took striking photos that gave America no choice but to look at the realities of war—showing what it did to people on both sides—from wounded soldiers to civilian casualties.

Later, Leroy was gravely wounded from shrapnel, but that didn’t keep her down more than a month. When captured by the North Vietnamese in 1968, she talked herself free after photographing her captors, scoring a cover story in Life magazine. A recipient of the George Polk Award, one of the most prestigious awards in journalism, Leroy was one of the most well-known photographers in the world during her time, and her legacy of bravery and compassion endures today.

Farrell interviewed people who knew Leroy, as well as military personnel and other journalists who covered the war. In addition to a preface by Pulitzer Prize-winning Vietnam War photographer Nick Ut and a foreword by Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Peter Arnett, the book includes an author’s note, endnotes, bibliography, timeline, and index.

Review: Before I read this book, I didn’t know anything about Catherine Leroy. This book not only taught me about this strong woman, but it taught me about Vietnam. After finishing this book, I felt like I had a better awareness of the world (but particularly of Vietnam and the United States. At the age of 21, French photojournalist Catherine Leroy decided she wanted to document the Vietnam War. Camera in hand, she went after her goals and didn’t take no for an answer. It is very clear that the author is a journalist, and she presents Leroy’s story in a way that is very engaging and well-written. This book made me want to be a better human, and I recommend it highly.

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: This would be an excellent book to use in a history classroom (as well as English classrooms!). It would work really well in a book clubs unit related to Vietnam, heroines, and photojournalism. The photographs alone make this book a stellar addition to classrooms, and the writing is magnificent.

Discussion Questions: 

  • What resistance did Catherine face? How did she react?
  • How does the author integrate photographs to tell us about Catherine Leroy’s work?
  • Which photographs were particularly powerful for you, and why?
  • What are key moments in Catherine’s life that tell you more about who she is as a person?
  • What did you learn about Vietnam? About the United States?

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Read This If You Love: Photography, Nonfiction, Books about War, Books about Strong Women

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**Thank you to Mary at Abrams for providing a copy for review!**

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Mythical Beasts: 100 Fun Facts About Real Animals and the Myths They Inspire
Author: Stephanie Warren Drimmer
Published

Summary: Calling all fans of unicorns, dragons, sea monsters, and other mythical creatures! Discover 100 marvelous facts that add to the magic in this new reader for fluent readers.

Key features include:

  • Expert-vetted text appropriate for ages 7 to 9
  • Brilliant and eye-catching National Geographic images
  • 100 fun facts spread throughout the book
  • A fact roundup at the end of each book for kids to review what they’ve learned

Packed with weird-but-true facts and tons of info, this Level 3 reader explores animals that are mistaken for mythical creatures, critters that are almost too weird for reality, and other creatures with incredible abilities. Learn all about these amazing, unbelievable, and downright fantastical beasts!

About the Author: STEPHANIE WARREN DRIMMER writes books and magazine features for kids about everything from the strangest places in space, to the chemistry of cookies, to the mysteries of the human brain. Drimmer has a degree in science journalism from New York University, but she thinks she likes writing for kids because she’s secretly still one herself.

Bling!: 100 Fun Facts About Gems
Author: Emma Carlson Berne
Published

Summary: Get ready to be dazzled by some of the shiniest, most colorful, useful—and even dangerous—rocks, minerals, and gems on the planet! In this Level 3 reader, discover fascinating facts about the incredible rocks and minerals under our feet and deep in Earth’s crust. Budding geologists will love reading about how rocks form, learning the names and features of the coolest rocks and minerals, and exploring rare and beautiful gemstones.

Key features include:

  • Expert-vetted text appropriate for ages 7 to 9
  • Brilliant and eye-catching National Geographic images
  • 100 fun facts sprinkled throughout the book*
  • A fact roundup at the end of each book for kids to review what they’ve learned

Packed with weird-but-true facts and tons of cool info, this Level 3 reader explores the incredible world of geology.

About the Author: EMMA CARLSON BERNE writes juvenile, middle grade, and YA fiction and nonfiction for both educational and trade publishers. She has worked on projects with Disney/Lucasfilm Press, American Girl Publishing, Simon & Schuster, Scholastic, Sterling Publishing, Capstone, Rosen, and Alloy Entertainment. Berne lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she is the writer-in-residence for the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County.


About the Series: This high-interest, educationally-vetted readers series features magnificent National Geographic images accompanied by text written by experienced, skilled children’s book authors. Each reader includes a glossary and interactive features in which kids get to use what they’ve learned in the book. Level 1 readers reinforce the content of the book with a kinesthetic learning activity. Level 2 readers feature slightly higher-level text and additional vocabulary words. Level 3 readers have more layers of information to challenge more proficient readers. For emerging readers, the Pre-reader level introduces vocabulary and concepts, and the Co-reader level provides a collaborative reading experience.

Review: I am such a fan of National Geographic Kids’ books. They do such a great job with engaging material that is perfect for the audience they are aimed for. With these Fact Reader Level 3 books, I really loved the mix of chapters with expository text mixed with text features that add to the text as well as fact lists that will make sure the reader leaves with fun facts to share. Everything that is shared in the books are so interesting and will definitely grab the readers attention. For example, in Bling!  we learn about rocks and minerals in space, different types of rocks, the oldest rocks, difference between rocks and minerals, and geology & archaeology information. Mythical Beasts includes mistaken identities, strange animals that are hard to believe, and animals with mythical powers. Both books are great nonfiction texts that are going to find so many early elementary readers!

Discussion Questions: 

  • How does the table of contents and index help you when reading a nonfiction book?
  • What text features did you notice throughout the book? How did they add to the book?
  • What facts did you learn from the book? What was your favorite fact you learned?
  • What else would you like to learn about the topics?

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Read This If You Love: Geology, Archaeology, Animals, Mythology, Nonfiction

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**Thank you to Karen at Media Masters for providing copies for review!**

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