Share

Magnificent Makers: How to Test a Friendship
Author: Theanne Griffith
Illustrator: Reggie Brown
Published May 19, 2020 by Random House Children’s Books

Summary: BOOM! SNAP! WHIZ! ZAP! The Magnificent Makers series is filled with science, adventure, and characters that readers will love!

A modern-day Magic School Bus for chapter book readers!

Violet and Pablo are best friends who love science! So when they discover a riddle that opens a magic portal in the Science Space at school, they can’t wait to check it out! Along with their new classmate, Deepak, the friends discover a magical makerspace called the Maker Maze. It’s a laboratory full of robots, 3D printers, an antigravity chamber, and more. Doors line the walls of the makerspace, with a new science adventure waiting behind each one.

Ricki’s Review: I think I’ve recommended this book to about fifteen people since we’ve read it. I really admire the way in which Griffith incorporates science in such a fun way. The book almost feels interactive. I am going to admit that I, an adult, learned some cool science information as we read this one. We read this book with our virtual book club of kids, and they all loved it. It was very easy to host discussions, and the kids were very animated as they talked about the sections that they loved most. This is a great early chapter book series that is going to be well-loved by teachers. The interdisciplinary nature of the text makes it very easy to teach. We will definitely be getting the next book in the series.

Kellee’s Review: As a mom of 1st grader who loves to read, we are always looking for new early chapter books that will grab his attention and this book is everything we could want. First, it is relatable. The dynamics between the three characters are accurate and just on point. It also deals with real feelings like jealousy and competitiveness. Second, it is about science! Trent is definitely a science loving kid, and adding some science into his books makes him love them more. Third, it is a reflection of the real world (even though they travel to another dimension) because there are a diversity of kids and adults both in looks and behavior. We have already gone to buy the next three in the series, and we cannot wait to see what adventure happens next!

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: This book offers many questions that can lead to inquiry and many topics that can be explored further by kids. Teachers might ask students to select a topic in science and write a fictional story about it. This would require some research and thinking about how information is presented in fiction.

Discussion Questions: 

  • What was your favorite aspect of science that you learned from the book?
  • What emotions did the characters experience in the book? Have you been in situations where you’ve felt these emotions?
  • What could you research from this book to learn more (e.g. robots, 3D printers, an antigravity chamber, the ecosystem)?

Flagged Passage: “Producers, consumers, decomposers, oh my! All are necessary for an ecosystem to survive. Most animals are __________. Living things, beware! If ____________ disappeared, we wouldn’t have fresh air. And without ______________, nature’s garbage would be everywhere! Solve this riddle to enter the maker maze” (p. 11).

Read This If You Love: Science books, early chapter books, interdisciplinary learning

Recommended For: 

classroomlibrarybuttonsmall

and Signature

Tagged with:
 
Share

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

Bold_line

Saturday: Sofia’s Kids’ Corner: Front Desk by Kelly Yang

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “The Truth Will Set You Free” by Andrew Avner, Author of Toro

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

Bold_line

Kellee

  • I am unable to review the novels I read these last couple of weeks because of my award committee commitment, so please check Goodreads to learn about any of them: Tune it Out, The Extraordinariesand Quack.
  • Picture books with Trent
    • Lali’s Feathers by Farhana Zia: A beautiful book about not judging things by first impressions.
    • My Book (Not Yours) by Ben Sanders: Fox and Sloth cannot decide whose book it is. It does not end well.
    • Feast of Peas by Kashmira Sheth: I have the song in this book memorized because Trent LOVES it! It is a story of forgiveness and the love of peas.
    • Another Book About Bears by Lauren Bunting: Although this is another book about bears it is just another book about bears. It is unlike any other and you will love it!
    • Rot, The Bravest in the World by Ben Clanton: A cute continuation of Rot’s story!
    • Chicken Little: The Real and Totally True Tale by Sam Wedelich: Another recent favorite of Trent’s. It takes the story of Chicken Little then twists and turns it.
    • The Worrysaurus by Rachel Bright: A good book to use to talk to kids about worries.
    • All Because You Matter by Tami Charles: B.E.A.U.T.I.F.U.L! Both the lyrical prose and the jaw-dropping artwork combine for a hard-hitting picture book.
    • When Father Comes Home by Sarah Jung: Based on a South Korean term about a Goose Father, this story looks at the highs and lows of a father that works far away.
    • Binny Diwali by Thrity Umrigar: What a beautiful introduction to Diwali! It is a great teachable book but also a good story.
    • Addy’s Cup of Sugar by Jon J. Muth: This is based on a Buddhist folktale about loss. Beautiful illustrations!
    • Idea Jar by Adam Lehrhaupt: Trent loves the silliness of this book while I love the neverending ideas it brings.
    • Antiracist Baby by Ibram X. Kendi: Kendi did an amazing job taking the ideas of his adult text and turning it into a picture book.
    • A Kids Book About Racism by Jelani Memory: What a perfect picture book to start a conversation about racism.
    • Piranhas Don’t Eat Bananas by Aaron Blabey: Silly silly silly. Trent adores it, and although I did too, I just don’t think piranhas and bananas rhymes!
  • Chapter Books with Trent:
    • Pete the Cat: Pete the Brave by James Dean: One of my more favorite Pete the Cat early readers.
    • Fergus and Zeke and the Field Day Challenge by Kate Messner: Another Fergus and Zeke–yay! I love these two little mice and all of their antics!
  • I have a question for parents: How do you keep track of the books your child reads themselves? I’ve kept track of everything that Trent and I read together, but now that he is reading alone, I want to keep track of the books he reads himself, but I don’t want to do it on MY Goodreads if I didn’t read it with him…

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2020 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

I am sorry—I have two weeks to get my book finished, so I will return ASAP! We’ve been reading a lot of new books, and I promise to share them all soon!

Bold_line

Kellee

Reading: Never Fear, Meena’s Here! by Karla Manternach

Listening: Breath Like Water by Anna Jarzab

Reading with Trent: Dog Man: Grime and Punishment by Dav Pilkey

Bold_line

Tuesday: The Magnificent Makers: How to Test a Friendship by Theanne Griffith, Illustrated by Reggie Brown

Sunday: Author Guest Post by Victor Hinojosa and Coert Voorhees, Authors of A Journey Toward Hope

Bold_line

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

 Signature andRickiSig

 
Share

“The Truth Will Set You Free”

I’ve always had an affinity for Aesop’s Fables and Disney animated films. I suppose, in part, that’s why my debut Latinx middle grade novel Toro features talking animals as principal characters in a story suffused with moral lessons, conceived to entertain, inspire, and educate.

From age-old fables and fairy tales to Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio to present-day fiction, lies and liars have always been present in children’s literature.

Lies are a part of the human condition, told, in the simplest terms, to seek pleasure or avoid pain. They can be used as both a sword and a shield, to prey upon or protect. The duality of lies never ceases to fascinate me. There are forgivable lies and unforgivable lies, harmless lies and harmful lies, selfless lies and selfish lies, big lies and little lies. To further confuse the matter, there are varying degrees of lies, gray areas, and subsets. There are survival lies, protective lies, cover-up lies, persuasive lies, lies by omission, and so on. Interestingly, the truth is singular in form—there’s only one truth—the truth. While some tales teach lessons by dealing liars their deserved punishments, others reward liars for using their cunning as a survival stratagem to outwit dangerous enemies.

Stories can help children understand the complex nature of lies and guide them to navigate those they will inevitably encounter, discern the good ones from the bad ones, and learn the value of honesty and the truth.

In my book Toro, Alicía Catalina Cortés is a Spanish cow who wants to run with the bulls in Pamplona to prove herself noble y bravo, which is noble and brave. Because she’s a cow, tradition and her overprotective father, Don Murciélago Cortés, forbid Alicía from the running of the bulls.

Diego Del Toro is a Spanish bull who’s always dreamed of becoming a star of the Texas rodeo. Because he’s a toro bravo, which is a fighting bull, tradition and his overbearing mother, Condesa Maria Del Toro, force Diego to run with the bulls.

When their paths cross, Alicía sees Diego as a means to an end. She tells him that four cowboys from Fort Worth, Texas are in Spain to recruit bulls for the rodeo (a lie). She promises to arrange a rodeo audition for him (another lie, as the cowboys are simply thrill-seeking tourists visiting Spain for the running of the bulls). In return, Diego allows Alicía to go to Pamplona in his place, disguised as him.

Alicía deceives Diego to achieve her goal of running with the bulls. At this point in the story, Diego is little more than a stranger to Alicía, and it’s easy for her to lie to him. Without understanding the consequences of her deception, her lies can initially be seen as cunning or resourceful, creative, and inventive. She’s not lying to hurt Diego. She’s lying to help herself, blinded by desire and fueled by imagination.

As the story progresses, Alicía grows closer to Diego, and her deception weighs upon her conscience. Her best friend and confidant, an Iberian lynx named Doña Madonna de Doñana, forces Alicía to face the grave repercussions of her lies. By misleading Diego, Alicía risks permanently ruining his life, robbing him of his dream of becoming a star of the rodeo and condemning him to a life in exile from his family for disgracing them by breaking their tradition of running with the bulls.

Alicía ultimately feels Diego is more important to her than her desire to run with the bulls. When her goal changes, her lies become a double-edged sword. The same lies that brought Alicía closer to what she thought she wanted, now drive Alicía further away from what she truly wants. Despite the terrible consequences she fears will befall her, Alicía chooses to embrace honesty and the all-conquering truth.

One of the underlying themes of Toro is that it’s best to be honest.

When a villain lies, we associate the behavior with villainy. But when a hero lies, we understand that even good people can make mistakes and be dishonest. Alicía is a flawed character who makes mistakes. However, she becomes an exemplary character when she takes responsibility for her mistakes, learns from them, and proactively makes amends.

Alicía’s lies teach children that actions and words should not always be taken at face value. Sometimes we must question another’s intentions, even if they’re as likable or central to our lives as a story’s protagonist.

Toro may be used as a starting point for conversations with children about honesty and how to handle situations regarding lies. The following are some additional thoughts to ponder or discuss after reading the book:

Try to identify all the lies in the story and determine which are told to seek pleasure versus avoid pain; e.g., though Alicía lies to Diego to seek pleasure by pursuing her goal, the first lie she tells in the story is intended to avoid pain by escaping a prearranged marriage to a character who will become the book’s central antagonist, Don Julián Hernández. Because of her lie, Alicía unknowingly sets the antagonistic force in motion.

Sometimes we lie to ourselves, as Don Julián lies to himself until story’s end. No good comes of this. Only when Don Julián accepts the truth can he find peace, happiness, and contentment.

Don Murciélago tells a protective lie to Alicía, but eventually he tells her the difficult truth. Could his lie be considered forgivable?

By masquerading as Diego, Alicía exhibits another form of lying, impersonation.

Doña Madonna—the embodiment of honesty and integrity—serves as Alicía’s moral compass and voice of reason. Notice her contrasting counterpart, Jesús de los Jabalíes. These are two of my favorite characters. They can look at the same situation and draw entirely different and opposed conclusions.

Lying and cunning are both deceptive, yet the former is considered a vice, the latter a virtue.

The truth always surfaces in Toro, often echoing the biblical adage “the truth will set you free.”

September 17th, 2020 from Black Rose Writing

About the Book: Alicía Catalina Cortés is a fast and fiery Spanish cow who desperately wants to run with the bulls in Pamplona—but since she’s a cow, tradition forbids her to partake in the fiesta of San Fermín. Through her journey, Alicía learns that to be noble and brave, she must follow her dream and her heart, even if it means defying tradition.

Andrew Avner’s debut Latinx middle grade novel Toro is a pocket testimonial to the female protagonist’s fight for equality and empowerment. It also represents and celebrates diverse experiences and identities.

Toro is set in the colorful backdrop of Pamplona, Spain during the fiesta of San Fermín and the running of the bulls, famed as one of the most exhilarating, dangerous, and spectacular events around the world. Ultimately, it’s a heartfelt, coming-of-age fable told from the cattle’s point of view. Like Charlotte’s Web, The Jungle Book, and Fantastic Mr. Fox, anthropomorphic talking animals drive the narrative.

About the Author: Andrew Avner graduated with honors from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Film and Television. After working in Manhattan with Academy Award-winning producer David Brown, Avner relocated to Los Angeles to develop his own original material. He’s currently writing and producing short films for The Walt Disney Company while penning his next novel. To learn more about the author and his work, please visit: www.andrewavner.com.

Thank you, Andrew, for this post on honesty and inspiration!

Tagged with:
 
Share

Sofia is an 8-year-old brilliant reader who aspires to be a book reviewer. On select Saturdays, Sofia will share her favorite books with kids! She is one of the most well-read elementary schoolers that we know, so she is highly qualified for this role!

Dear readers,

I am going to recommend a book about an amazing girl who went through a lot of hard times and stayed brave. This amazing book is called Front Desk by Kelly Yang. This book is recommended for ages 8-12.

Mia is an immigrant from China and moves to America. She lives in a car for some time while her parents look for jobs. They see an ad in the newspapers saying there is a motel owner looking for an experienced motel manager. The ad says that the owner of a little motel in Anaheim, California is looking for someone to run the place. Mia’s parents jump at the chance and they get hired. They would also get paid a lot of money while doing it! Mia makes amazing friendships with customers and when she thinks nothing can go wrong the owner whose name is Mr. Yao lowers their pay. That means that there isn’t much money they are getting and that is bad. When Mia starts going to school more problems pop up. Like a girl named Lupe. She is Mia’s friend and Mia thinks it is because she told her she lives in a big house and has a golden retriever but none of that is true. It gets even worse when she realizes that the motel owner’s  son is in her class. The thing is the son is not exactly nice to her.

One person loses a job because of Mr. Yao and can not pay to stay in Mr. Yao’s motel anymore so Mr. Yao tells him to go. That person is one of Mia’s best friends and Mia hides him inside of the motel. Soon Mia’s immigrant relatives start coming and stay for free. Will Mr. Yao find them and kick them out or will Mia and her family keep the immigrants hidden from him?

There is so much more to this story but you have to read it for yourself.

I love this book because of all the suspense it gave me reading it. So many times I guessed the wrong thing that would happen next. I also love this book because it also really pulled me into the story. My parents could even listen to music and I wouldn’t even hear it! I also had that book with me everywhere I went. My parents almost couldn’t convince me for a bike ride, one of my favorite things! I hope you get as wound up in the book as I did!!

If this book leads you to want to know more of her story then check out the sequel called Three Keys! I have not read it yet but it is definitely on my Need To Read!!!!! list.

**Thank you, Sofia, for your continued brilliance. You inspire us!**

 

Tagged with:
 
Share

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

Bold_line

Saturday:  Sofia’s Kids’ Corner: My Favorite Books by Roald Dahl

Sunday: Author Guest Post by L.G. Reed, Author of The Science of Defying Gravity

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

Bold_line

Labor Day is an annual holiday to celebrate the economic and social  contributions of workers to the wealth… | Labor day pictures, Happy labor  day, Labor day holiday

Bold_line

Saturday: Sofia’s Kids’ Corner: Front Desk by Kelly Yang

Sunday: Author Guest Post by Andrew Avner, Author of Toro

Bold_line

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

 Signature andRickiSig

 
Share

“Getting Kids Interested in Science” 

Your kid begs you to help her build a model of a volcano or a model airplane or experiment with chemistry. An impossible dream? I argue the answer is NO! Science is all around us and you can get your kids excited about exploring science with fun, easy projects that can be done at home.

Why bother getting kids excited about science? Because it can be a fun way to learn! I had a friend who was a propulsion engineer and she would go to schools to talk. Now, let’s face it, propulsion engineer sounds pretty dull – right? She started her talks by saying, “I blow things up for a living.” That got the kids attention! A career blowing things up sounded pretty darn cool. Well, among other things, science teaches us how things blow up, through chemistry and physics. Scientific processes do amazing things every day. Make it fun and your kids will love it!

  • Let’s start with a few basics. Science is broken down into disciplines, or categories: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, Geology. Some people would add space science (also known as astronomy and psychology

Kids may gravitate to one or the other. Here is a quick breakdown of the difference between them.

  • Biology – the study of life systems, including humans.
  • Chemistry – the study of the property of matter and how matter changes, along with the elements of the periodic table and how they interact to create materials, drugs, foods, fuels…
  • Physics – the study of the elemental rules that govern our lives on earth. Magnetism, Gravity, and how these forces effect matter.
  • Geology – the study of the structure of the earth.
  • Astronomy – the study of the planets, stars and the universe, and psychology –the study of the human psyche.

I you aren’t sure what area of science your child gravitates to (see I used a science term there to mean what they are pulled toward) that’s not a problem. Most aspects of science are addressed by more than one discipline.  Below are some experiments or projects kids can do at home to explore what interests them. You’ll want to be on hand to help.

Biology – Plant a sunflower seed. As it grows, observe how the flower head follows the sun or artificial grow light in a demonstration of heliotropism. Or plant a cucumber seed and place a stick or taut string beside the plant and observe how the tendrils wrap around the string. Which way do they go? Then have the kids do some research to understand why. This project takes a bit of time, as the seeds need to germinate and grow. Use the time to encourage your kids to read up on how a seed turns into a plant. Find this and more at the following website: https://www.shareitscience.com/search?q=tendrils

Chemistry – Start with a hardboiled egg. Place it in a container with vinegar. Let it sit for at least a day. It will get all fizzy and scuzzy. Then wash it off and watch as the shell dissolves. Vinegar, or acetic acid, has dissolved the shell, which is mostly calcium, leaving the egg underneath. Find this and more at the following website: https://www.3plearning.com/blog/simple-chemistry-experiments-kids-home/#Egg

Physics – Take four popsicle sticks and three rubber bands and make a catapult. See how far you can toss a coin or other light object. Does the weight of the object effect the distance or height it reaches? (use objects of differing weights) This one should be done with adult supervision as the rubber bands can break, or kids might decide to see whether it hurts to have a penny chucked at them. Check out the details and an illustrative video at this website: https://interestingengineering.com/7-diy-physics-experiments-that-will-impress-everyone

Geology – Using just corn flower and water you can make your own quicksand. This one is messy, so outside please! https://www.sciencekids.co.nz/experiments/quicksand.html

One last tidbit. Search Pinterest for SCIENCE PROJECTS FOR KIDS. And find links to loads of websites that contain interesting projects for you and your kids to explore the different areas of science. Couple the experiment with a discussion about what is happening and a supervised internet search for reasons to explain observations and you’ve got yourself an engaged, citizen-scientist in the making!

About the Author: Author and publisher, L. G. Reed believes stories that provide an artistic or relationship story along with a science focus can be an effective way to hook girls into STEM, especially at the earliest ages. She targets middle school because research has shown that these years are crucial to establishing girl’s interest in STEM topics.

Reed’s background in science and technology came from her career as an aerospace engineer, and her latest book THE SCIENCE OF DEFYING GRAVITY reflects that. She insists, however, that the book isn’t just about science. It’s about perseverance and curiosity — because every kid has those traits. Her goal is to spark their interest and get them to think that science and tech is something they can do.

Reed’s debut novel, The Maiden Voyage of the Maryann won the Cygnus Awards 1st Place – Women’s Fantasy/SciFi Category. Her second book, a middle-grade fantasy titled Sydney Porter: Dog Girl was an Amazon best seller.

Adding to her writing, she is channeling her love of books and writers into Keyes Canyon Press, an independent publisher focusing on middle grade and young adult fiction, and poetry for all ages.  Keyes Canyon Press seeks outstanding manuscripts that encourage reading and learning. Un-agented authors are encouraged to submit.

www.keyescanyonpress.com

Expected Publication: September 9th, 2020 from Keyes Canyon Press

About the Book: THE SCIENCE OF DEFYING GRAVITY is a middle-grade STEM based fiction. 11 yr old Cassie films her life. She loves movies and dreams of becoming a movie director in space. When her plans to go to Space Camp are derailed when her dad loses his job and she must win a science fair to earn a scholarship to attend. Spunk, a caring teacher, an engineering mentor and her friends keep her dream on track.

Contained within THE SCIENCE OF DEFYING GRAVITY is an actual science fair project, including tables and charts for kids to see. The project covers the four forces of flight—lift, thrust, gravity and drag—which are embedded in the fictional story but are factually accurate and have been verified by working engineers and engineering students.

“Useful, entertaining, and encouraging; will inspire confidence and an appreciation of science.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Tweens who enjoy making, building, and learning will get the most from this book about what it takes to become a scientist.” — Booklife Reviews

Thank you, L.G., for these fun science activities for kids!

Tagged with:
 
Share

Sofia is an 8-year-old brilliant reader who aspires to be a book reviewer. On select Saturdays, Sofia will share her favorite books with kids! She is one of the most well-read elementary schoolers that we know, so she is highly qualified for this role!

Dear readers,

I have again decided to change things up a bit. This time I will be recommending several books by the same author. His name is Roald Dahl. I haven’t read many of his books, but the ones that I have read were truly amazing. They make great read-alouds, too. I recommend the books that I am covering in this review for about ages 7-12.

The first time I heard about this author’s creations was when my first grade teacher read my class Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, probably Roald Dahl’s most famous book. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is about a poor boy named Charlie Bucket who walks past Willy Wonka’s

factory on his way to school. Charlie always stops and sniffs the amazing smells of Wonka’s factory for he only gets one candy bar per year and that is on his birthday. That singular bar he gets on his birthday, he saves by nibbling little by little off each day. When Willy Wonka announces in the newspaper that five, only five, of his Wonka bars have a golden ticket inside that will get five lucky kids into the factory, everybody goes crazy about buying Wonka bars. It seems unlikely for Charlie to get the Golden Ticket but who knows, maybe he will be lucky…

I was very excited when my friend visited and gave me a collection of most of Roald Dahl’s children’s books. She even recommended Matilda which is now one of my favorite books by him. Matilda is about a girl named Matilda who loves to read and is super smart. Matilda’s parents are mean and force her to watch television when she would rather be reading a book, so she puts up a secret policy of her own… When Matilda is finally old enough to go to school she meets her nice teacher Miss Honey and her terrible principal Miss Trunchbull. Matilda is the smartest kid in her class because she reads so many books. Miss Honey is fascinated by Matilda’s knowledge and likes that she does not brag about it.

This book was so good I decided to read it to my four year old sister. Introducing Fantastic Mr Fox! Fantastic Mr Fox is about a father fox and his family. When it gets dark the father fox always carefully slips out of his home to steal some food from three mean farmers. Their names are Bean, Bunce and Boggis and they all run their own type of farm. They are very mean and know that he is stealing their stuff and are furious about it. They make plans to catch him, but none of them have worked so far. Can they do it or will Mr Fox outfox them?

The book that I am about to present to you is one that I read with my friend for a sort of book club. Presenting The Witches! The Witches is about a boy who has a grandma who tells stories about witches. She tells him always to be on the lookout for them because they can kill you and eat you. She tells him a few things that witches always have. First, a real witch is certain to have gloves. Second, a real witch is always bald but wears a wig that usually itches. Third, a real witch has slightly bigger nostrils. Fourth, a real witch has different eyes than normal people because where we have a black dot in the middle of our eye theirs change color all the time. There are more ways to identify a witch, but you need to read the book to find out. The grandma says that there is a Grand High Witch which is basically the queen of all witches. She is the meanest of all the witches and all of the witches are petrified of her. When the boy comes out to climb a tree one time, a strange lady suddenly appears under the tree and tells him to come down. The boy suddenly sees she has all the characteristics of a witch and starts to climb higher. Will the witch get him or will he escape?

This book must be popular among my teachers because after I read it my teacher read it, too. A perfectly magical book called The Magic Finger! The Magic Finger is about a girl who has a finger that shoots some sort of magic when someone makes her mad. Her neighbors have a habit of hunting and the girl doesn’t like them doing it. She thinks that it doesn’t seem right to kill animals just for the fun of it. The girl can’t help it, she puts the magic finger on them all, even the wife that does not hunt. Sorry, but you have to read the book to find out what happens to them.

In case it is not obvious why I like these books, it is because Roald Dahl is a great storyteller and his books are bursting with fantasy and crazy ideas. If you want to learn about the author, I highly recommend a book called Who was Roald Dahl? by True Kelly.

**Thank you, Sofia, for your continued brilliance. You inspire us!**

 

Tagged with: