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top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Books We Recently Added To Our To-Be-Read Lists

So many books. So little time!

Ricki

1. Saint Anything by Sarah Dessen

saint anything

I was thrilled to receive an advanced copy of this e-book, and I will be reading it very soon! I love Sarah Dessen!

2. The Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine

the lions of little rock

“Two girls separated by race form an unbreakable bond during the tumultuous integration of Little Rock schools in 1958.” I only needed to read this first line to know that I regretted missing this one in 2012. I plan to see if my library has a copy because I don’t think I received it.

3. Under a Painted Sky by Stacey Lee

under a painted sky

I have been told this is a great book for fans of Code Name Verity. I just need to get my hands on a copy! It is set in Missouri, 1849. How awesome does that time period seem? I can’t wait to read it.

4. Migrant: The Journey of a Mexican Worker by Jose Manuel Mateo 

migrant

A few people have discussed this book recently. It received a starred review, and I never got a chance to read it. It tells the story of a Mexican boy who journeys to the U.S.

5. Picture this: The Near-Sighted Monkey Book by Lynda Barry

picture this

This graphic memoir how-to seems like good fun. Thank you to the blogger who posted about it. I am a fool and can’t remember who it was, but I added it to my TBR list!

Kellee

I do not add books to my Goodreads to-be-read list very often anymore because it was getting so overwhelming! However, here are five books I added to my list recently.

Marty McGuire Has Too Many Pets! by Kate Messner

marty

I love Marty McGuire. She is who I hope my son is friends with. I need to read the newest, so I can see what she has been up to.

Silver by Chris Wooding

silver

I have a vicarious reader in my class who usually just tells me that a book is “good” or “okay” or “not for me,” but she said Silver is probably the best book she’s ever read. I really want to read it to see what grabbed her so.

Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky

gracefully

I not only want/need to read Gracefully Grayson, I need to get it into my classroom library. The concept of being transgender is not often mentioned where middle schoolers would hear, but with Glee‘s Coach Beiste and Unique and Bruce Jenner, I have students asking me Why? How? etc. I would love to have a book to give them to help them understand.

Moonpenny Island by Tricia Springstubb

moonpenny

After reading Tricia’s guest posts on our blog and Nerdy Book Club, I knew I needed to read Moonpenny Island because I love how she wrote. I also have Tricia’s Cody and the Fountain of Happiness to read.

The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man by Michael Chabon

awesome man

Michael Chabon has a picture book?!?! I had no idea until a month or so ago. I need to read it!

Which books have you added to your TBR recently? 

RickiSig and Signature

 
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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Sheila at Book Journeys. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Jen Vincent, of Teach Mentor Texts, and Kellee decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Last Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday Meet bacteria life in outer space monster goose

Tuesday: Top Ten Books from Childhood (or Teen Years) We’d Like to Revisit

Friday: Review and Author Guest Post “Josh, Harrison & Dad’s Excellent Adventure” by Henry L. Herz, Author of Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

 Last Week’s Journeys

Kellee: Spring break was good to me! I am so proud of myself because I did a good job of relaxing, spending time with family, and reading. I finished five novels!!! Woot! I enjoyed all of them, but three are new favorites.Both Big Fat Disaster by Beth Fehlbaum (such a hard book to read! And it just kept getting worse and worse!) and The Vigilante Poets of Selwyn Academy by Kate Hattemer (a look at art, poetry, and reality TV) were very good; however, 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith, Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan, and Better Nate Than Ever by Tim Federle were just so superb. Andrew Smith is just amazing at crafting a plot with fascinating characters! His books often seem like just another teen book, but then he is able to make them so special. Counting by 7s is such a special book. I now understand why it is compared to Out of my Mind, Wonder, and Mockingbird although I find a lot of comparisons to Fish in a Tree as well. Willow Chance is such an amazing little girl, and the way she is able to change the world around her even in the midst of grieving is inspiring. Finally, Better Nate Than Ever was the perfect book to read this week. It was funny, heart-warming, and had musicals!! I want to go back to high school (I never say that!) at my arts high school, bring Nate with me, and be his best friend! (And btw, the audiobook is so great!)

Like Henry (see below), Trent is only interested in certain books. It makes me a bit sad that he throws fits if we try a new book, but I also love that he has favorites. We were able to squeeze in two new ones in between favorites: Look by Jeff Mack (the personality of this book shines! I also love the use of only 2 words) and Pete the Cat: Big Easter Adventure by James Dean (nothing lives up to the original, but I love that we could read about Easter with Trent’s favorite character).

Ricki: For those of you kind folks who are tracking my long progress in the doctoral program, I am excited to say that I submitted my materials for my comprehensive exams—which are one month from today. AH! I will keep you all posted about how this goes. This week, I made a lot of progress in many books, and I also finished a picture book, Won Ton and Chopstick: A Cat and Dog Tale Told in Haiku  by Lee Wardlaw. It was good fun, and I particularly recommend it for use in middle or high school settings. It is important to infuse picture books into older classrooms. With scaffolding and assistance from an adult, young kids would also enjoy navigating this fun book. I think it is very important to challenge our students, and the balance of vocabulary and a fun storyline will make this book a great resource to teachers.

Henry (who is 16 months old now) shows strong preferences for books. He only wants to read truck books. Like an adult, his draws his pointer finger across the bindings until he reaches any book with the title, Trucks (and his grandmother has bought just about every truck board book that exists). I can recite the position of each of those tractors, skid steers, and all-terrain vehicles on the pages in my sleep. I am excited that he said his first word this week—“car!” (I don’t think “Mama,” “Dada,” “uh oh,” “no,” and “okay” count, right?). So along with a book update, you got a life update. Sorry—next week, it is back to books.

This Week’s Expeditions

Kellee: I have already downloaded Five, Six, Seven, Nate because I cannot wait to hear what happens to Nate next! I also plan on starting Hunt for the Bamboo Rat by Graham Salisbury tonight. We’re also trying to read a few new books with Trent, including another Easter book, but we’ll see.

Ricki: Still reading and enjoying Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin. My book club meets Tuesday, so I will definitely be done with this one within 48 hours. :) I also listened to three more discs of East of Eden by John Steinbeck. I love it—but I find it very disturbing. I think I’ve reached disc 15 out of 23. It’s quite epic.

Upcoming Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday babe ruth ted williams henry aaron pedro must-read-2015-logo girls like us fade to black Book Cover - Masks and Mirrors

Tuesday: Ten Books We’ve Recently Added to Our To-Be-Read Lists

Sunday: Author Guest Post by Sue Duff, Author of Fade to Black and Mask and Mirrors

 So, what are you reading?

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

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monster goose

Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes
Authors: Henry, Josh, and Harrison Herz
Illustrator: Abigail Larson
Published February 7th, 2015 by Pelican Publishing Company

Goodreads Summary: Enter an enchanted land of mythical creatures where manticores reign and ogres roar-a land of mystery and fright. A unique twist on traditional rhymes of everyone’s youth, “Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes” presents a more sinister approach to these childhood classics, and yet the sing-song nature of the poems renders them playful and jovial at the same time. Little Witch Muffet is not frightened by a silly, little spider; she simply adds him to her stew!

Rotten zombies, giants, dwarves, and goblins mingle with werewolves, centaurs, and fauns. Follow along the skeleton stepping stones, scale up a palisade, claw at the window of a tasty child and bake him into a pumpkin shell. Monsters cook up delicious elvish pie, too! Every kid who has an eensy weensy bit of sense wants a pet with feathers white as snow, who flies like an eagle and bleats like a goat-a hippogriff, of course!

Six forest sprites with four times as many pixies escape from a loaf of bread atop the elaborate table of the fey queen; her feast has flown away! If you enjoy mischief and have a penchant for the morbidly hilarious, the Herzs’ rhymes will satisfy your mythological curiosities.

Larson’s illustrations give new life to these ancient figures, and her artistic style employs the bold lines and colorful movement of an action-packed comic book. The author also includes a “bestiary” with information about the book’s legendary creatures, which hail from Scotland, Germany, Italy, Persia, Haiti, and Scandinavia.

Kellee’s Review and Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: Really like the creativity of mashing monster/mythology and nursery rhymes. A great intro to all things traditional lit and fantasy in a rhyming, fun way. I especially liked that the creatures hail from a variety of places and that the author included an appendix that includes information about each of them. I think this book would be a great way to introduce mythology as well as give students an opportunity to make their own parody of a nursery rhyme using a creature.

One thing that makes this book special is that Henry Herz wrote this book with his two sons. I am happy to share with you a post about their collaboration:

Josh, Harrison, and Dad’s Excellent Adventure

Henry, Josh & Harrison Herz

The astute observer will notice that there are three author credits for Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes. That’s because my young sons were involved in its creation. This is the tale of how two boys became traditionally published authors.

A few years ago (in a galaxy far away), I wanted to share my love of fantasy with my young sons.  They were too little for watching most of the fantasy and sci-fi movie classics, and there are only so many good fantasy books available for that age range.  Struck by inspiration one day, I came up with a way to share the joy of entering the magical realms of fantasy. I would write a fantasy book for them.

What I did not anticipate was that my boys would give me feedback on the story.  They devised some of the character (Nimpentoad) and creature (Neebel) names and made plot line suggestions.  And who better to help make the story appealing to kids than other kids?  So, the goal of interesting my sons in fantasy transformed into also encouraging them to write.

Originally, I only shared the story of Nimpentoad with family, for their own enjoyment.  I had no thoughts of having the book published.  But one day, my sister-in-law suggested that I consider publication because she felt the story was much better than many of the books she was seeing for her similarly-aged kids.  I thought about it for a while, and decided to give it a try.

The first step was to find the right artist. Once again, my sons were involved, this time in providing art direction.  We would explain in words what each illustration should contain.  Collaborating remotely via email and DropBox, our artist would give us a rough sketch, and we would provide feedback on details and color palette.  Nimpentoad came to life, while my boys added another dimension to their experience.

Given the amount of time that had passed, as well as the anticipated challenges with finding an agent or publisher willing to take a chance on an unproven writer, we decided to indie-publish.  The response to Nimpentoad was encouraging, and we subsequently indie-published Twignibble (an easy reader about a mechanically-inclined sloth, who travels the world helping his endangered animal friends), and How the Rhino Got His Skin (an updated picture book version of Rudyard Kipling’s classic).

We’ve done book readings and signings at schools, libraries, museums, farmer’s markets, book fairs, and bookstores. My boys are now experienced sales professionals! They know how to handle themselves with new people, and easily sell more books than I do.

Like any good author, I am committed to honing my craft. I belong to critique groups, participate in Tara Lazar’s annual Picture Book Idea Month (PiBoIdMo) event, and took a picture book writing class at UCSD. Part of the class curriculum was to draft some picture book manuscripts. Kids love monsters and I love monsters (being a big kid myself), and so the idea for Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes was born.

As with our other collaborations, I drafted the book, and then had my sons review it. Then it went through my critique group and more revisions. I subsequently attended the Orange County Editor’s Day event hosted by the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes won best picture book. After that, it was time to query agents and editors. Happily, several editors expressed interest. We chose Pelican Publishing, and the rest is history.

Writing rhyming picture books is very challenging (see why at http://wp.me/p31Xf4-K0). I jokingly encourage newbie writers to visit www.DontDoRhyme.com (not a real website). The irony is not lost on me that my debut traditionally published picture book is in rhyme. My only excuse is that I didn’t have to invent the meter, I just had to twist the words to fit the existing meter.

If you want to interest your kids in mythological creatures, or fantasy literature in general, give Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes a look. Just take care – Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes is a gateway book to The Lightning Thief and, eventually, to The Lord of the Rings.

Learn more about Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes at http://www.birchtreepub.com/mgnr.htm.

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**Thank you to Henry L. Herz for providing a copy for review and for the guest post!**

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Life in Outer Space
Author: Melissa Keil
Published August 1st, 2013 by Peachtree Publishers

Goodreads Summary: Sam is a geek movie-buff with a ragtag group of loser friends who have been taking abuse from the popular kids for years. But when the super-cool Camilla moves to town, she surprises everyone by choosing to spend time with Sam’s group. Suddenly they go from geek to chic, and find that not everything boils down to us and them. With their social lives in flux, Sam and Camilla spend more and more time together. They become the best of friends, and Sam finds that he’s happier and more comfortable in his own skin than ever before. But eventually Sam must admit to himself that he’s fallen in love. If he confesses his true feelings to Camilla, will everything change again?

My Review: Kellee wrote her review almost a year ago, and after reading her review, I laughed because my notes about this book are so similar to her thoughts.

While reading this book, I thought about its connections to Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli and Paper Towns by John Green, and the narrator reminded me of Charlie from The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. But while this book is similar to others, it is very different.

Sam makes being geeky feel cool. I am geeky, so I appreciated this. He experiences tough life issues that many teenagers face, and he doesn’t lie about his lack of knowledge about dealing with these issues or understanding girls. The book contains scenes with World of Warcraft and there is a lot of information about horror movies (both of which aren’t interesting to me), yet I remained very engaged in the story and the characters. Keil writes the male narrator very well, and I think all types of adolescents will identify with the themes of this book. This is one of Kellee’s favorite books, and I see why. Thank you for nagging me to read it, Kel. It is one that will stick with me forever.

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: Why hasn’t this book received more press? It belongs in classrooms. As a teacher, I would use it as a mentor text for characterization. The scenes with Camilla are written breathtakingly well. If students read these scenes, they would want to read the entire book.

Discussion Questions: Did you find Camilla to be realistic? Could a student walk in and change the entire dynamic at the school in such a powerful way?; Why does Camilla like Sam? Is this realistic?; In what ways are media used by Keil to engage readers?; What does this book teach us about friendship?; How does Sam’s family life add to the complexity of this book?

We Flagged: “I guess some people enter your orbit and get stuck, and there’s nothing either of you can do about it” (p. 70).

And I loved the quote Kellee picked out. It is the scene I remember the most in the book:

“She is wearing a yellow dress that looks like it belongs to a 1950s housewife, and a pair of flat red boots. Her hair is longer than I’d imagine would be practical; it’s parted in the middle and hangs in brown waves almost to her waist. She peers around the room impassively. She doesn’t look terrified. She doesn’t look insanely overconfident, like Adrian that time in year seven when he performed a song as his book report for The Outsiders. Mike and I mark that event as ground zero for the downward social spiral of our group.” (p. 11)

Read This If You Loved: The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky, Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli, Paper Towns by John Green, Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

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Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday

Nonfiction Picture Book Wednesday is hosted by Kid Lit Frenzy and was started to help promote the reading of nonfiction texts. Most Wednesdays, we will be participating and will review a nonfiction text (though it may not always be a picture book).
Be sure to visit Kid Lit Frenzy and see what other nonfiction books are shared this week!

Meet bacteria

Mummy Nature Book 1: Meet Bacteria!
Author and Illustrator: Rebecca Bielawski
Published October 8, 2014 by Rebecca Bielawski

Goodreads Summary: Peak through the microscope and down into a fantastic world of teeny tiny shapes, amazing colours and little friends who want to say – Hello. Who are these bacteria? Where do they live and what do they do all day? Meet Bacteria! is for little kids brimming with curiosity. It gives them their first basic notions of bacteria; a very interesting topic for children, seldom dealt within children’s books at this level.

Each book in the series is one mini nature lesson wrapped up in colour and rhyme. These books are intended for very young children including toddlers and will give them just a glimpse into some of the wonders of the natural world. Illustrated for maximum vibrancy and visual impact, using rhyme to engage young minds and encourage participation. Read the rhymes to your children and soon they will be reading them to you!

What We Can Learn:
The idea of the microscope
Why we should wash our hands

Concepts:
Basic bacteria shapes
Some bacteria habitats

New Words:
Bacteria, Microscope, Rod, Chain, Bunch, Multiply

Kellee’s Review and Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: This book is a great introduction to scientific exploration and then to bacteria itself. I love that the protagonist is a young girl who is exploring the world around her. I think students will see themselves in her, and that along with the interesting, rhyming information about the different types of bacteria will really persuade kids to want to explore.

I do think that this is just an introduction though. Each bacteria is briefly mentioned along with a fun illustration. I would love to see this book be a jumping off point to an inquiry unit about bacteria.

Discussion Questions: Why does bacteria have a bad reputation? Which bacteria cause this? Which bacteria are actually good?; How can you prevent the bad bacteria from making us sick?; Bacteria make some foods. How does this work?

We Flagged: 

bacteria1 bacteria2 bacteria3

Images from https://www.pinterest.com/booksbeck/childrens-picture-books/
© Rebecca Bielawski

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**Thank you to Rebecca Bielawski for providing a copy for review!**

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top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Top Ten Books From Childhood (or Teen Years) We’d Like to Revisit

These are favorite books from childhood which we hope to revisit someday.

Ricki

1. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Jester

Phantom Tollbooth

The only thing I remember about this book is that I really, really liked it. I just bought it to read to my son, but I am waiting until he is a bit older.

2. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett

Secret Garden

I must have read this book and watched the movie hundreds of times. This book has a firm place in my childhood. My son will be watching it.

3. A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett

A Little Princess

You can only imagine how shocked I was (just now) when I discovered that The Secret Garden and A Little Princess, both of which I doted on as a child, are written by the same author. I feel like an idiot for not knowing this!

4. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Little Women

Let me count the ways I loved this book as a child. I would love to reread it.

5. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O’Brien

mrs. frisby and the rats of nimh

This book was quite important to my childhood. Those rats were pretty dang smart!

Honorary Mention: Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

Charlotte's Web

Who didn’t love Charlotte’s Web? I am curious if I would like this book as much as an adult as I did as a child.

Kellee

My favorite books as a child were Roald Dahl and The Baby-Sitters Club. I’ve been lucky to have revisited most of Roald Dahl’s books and BSC books 1-31 in the last ten years or so (though I’d always love to reread them again) which is why I have not included them. Here are some other favorites I’d love to reread.
(P.S. I also loved Flowers in the Attic by V.C. Andrews when I was a teen, but I reread it a few years ago as well. Not as well written or scandalous as I remembered.)

1. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

brooklyn

This was my coming-of-age book. It was my mom’s favorite, but I wasn’t allowed to read it until I was 12 so the anticipation was extreme. It became my first “big book” and my first book with very tough themes. But I loved it so! I would love to reread it to visit Francie Nolan again.

2. B is for Betsy (and other Betsy books) by Carolyn Haywood

betsy

Betsy is another special book because of the bond it created with my mom. She would read the Betsy books to my sister and I before bed. I loved following Betsy’s adventures! (I want Betsy to make a comeback! Fans of Jennifer Holm and Kate DiCamillo would love her!)

3. Beezus and Ramona (series) by Beverly Cleary

beezus

Who doesn’t love this series?! Ramona Quimby is such a spitfire! These books cracked me up and were a perfect move up from Betsy.

4. Sideways Stories from Wayside School (series) by Louis Sachar

sideways

After Ramona, I moved to Louis Sachar books. Sideways Stories was probably my favorite because it was just so odd!

5. The Last Vampire (series) and others by Christopher Pike

last vampire

In high school, I moved into reading R.L. Stine’s Fear Street and Christopher Pike, but my favorite were by far Pike’s Last Vampire, Remember Me,  Chain Letter, and Final Friends; however, The Last Vampire was the one I reread a few times. I’d love to revisit it to see why I liked it so much.

Honorary Mention: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle

wrinkle

I added this one because I read it in 6th grade in Miss Spalding’s class and really, really didn’t like it. I think now, as a more mature reader, I may like it more, so I would love to reread it one day.

Which books from your childhood would you love to reread?

RickiSig and Signature

 
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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme hosted by Sheila at Book Journeys. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Jen Vincent, of Teach Mentor Texts, and Kellee decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

Last Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday bathtub stillbathtub counting-crows-9781442423275_hr

fish Just_Jake_cover-230x300 Cover Dog Eat Dog Just Jake

Tuesday: Top Ten Books On Our Spring TBRs

Sunday: Author’s Guest Post!: “A Love for Reading Begets Passionate Writing” by Jake Marcionette, Author of Just Jake

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

 Last Week’s Journeys

Kellee: This last week I read two very different YA novels: Words and their Meaning by Kate Bassett and Noggin by John Corey Whaley. Words may be one of the most depressing and emotionally-intense book I’ve read in a while. Noggin, on the other hand, was a bit emotionally-intense, but it also was super unique and quite funny. I can see why it was a National Book Award finalist (though I wish the focus had been a bit more on Travis and less on Cate).

I also read two picture books this week: The Red Bicycle: The Extraordinary Story of One Ordinary Bike by Jude Isabella and Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes by Henry L. Hetz. I loved the story of The Red Bicycle. It just shows how one thing can change so many peoples’ lives. Monster Goose will be reviewed on Friday, so stop back.

With Trent, we are continuing to read the same books over and over (see our 9-12 month favorites list). I try to switch it up, but he is just not interested. I now have Fifteen Animals by Sandra Boynton, Personal Penguin by Sandra Boynton, and Pete the Cat by Erit Litwin & James Dean completely memorized.

Ricki: I finished Life in Outer Space by Melissa Keil, which is nothing about outer space. The main character reminds me of Charlie from The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. Last week, I compared it to other books, but all in all, it is quite lovely. I hate movies and don’t like video gaming, but it incorporated these two topics in a way that was interesting to me. This book would be a fantastic addition to classrooms. 

Henry and I received a lot of great, new books this week from relatives. His favorite is Gallop!: A Scanimation Picture Book by Rufus Butler Seder. It doesn’t have much depth, but the scanimation part is admittedly cool. The animals run when you move the pages.

This Week’s Expeditions

Kellee: I am still listening to Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan, but this week is spring break which means I may not listen to as much as I do on a work week. Trent is home with me this week as well, so I am going to try to read 5-7 books this week; however, it is going to be tough. We’ll see!! I am going to start 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith tonight as book one.

Ricki: I started reading Rain Reign by Ann M. Martin this week, and I love it. I am still working on balancing work and life, so while this one book a week thing is making me feel pathetic, it just has to do. My date for my comprehensive exams is on April 30, so I have been doing a lot of planning for them. 

Upcoming Week’s Posts

top ten tuesday Meet bacteria life in outer space monster goose

Tuesday: Top Ten Books from Childhood (or Teen Years) We’d Like to Revisit

Friday: Review and Author Guest Post “Josh, Harrison & Dad’s Excellent Adventure” by Henry L. Herz, Author of Monster Goose Nursery Rhymes

 So, what are you reading?

Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

 Signature andRickiSig