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I Like Animals…What Jobs Are There?
Author: Steve Martin
Illustrator: Roberto Blefari
Published March 1st, 2020 by Kane Miller Books

Summary: What do you want to do when you grow up? Children who love animals can find out all about potential future careers, from veterinarian to zookeeper to pet portrait artist, as they’re taken through a “day in the life” of 25 different animal workers.

Praise: 

Review: This book was written for so many kids out there! If any of you are librarians or teachers, you know how popular nonfiction animal books are. There are so few kids out there that don’t love animals! My son is one of those kids that adores animals and already says that he wants to be a zoologist and work with turtles, so when I saw this book, I knew I had to get it for him. What I love about the book (and the series I hope it is!) is that it gives options that kids may not know they have. Trent’s first thought for working with animals is working at a zoo, but there is so much more than that which he can choose from.

Each job’s section is really well done! It is written in first person from the point of view of the professional and includes fun yet truthful information, including the best and worst parts. Then, in the back, there is a flow map that helps kids see which job might be their perfect match, and there’s even back matter with more jobs. What a way to open up a kid’s imagination for the future!

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: My first thought was that this book could be an awesome mentor text for creating a similar type pamphlet. Students could pick something like sports, technology, children, etc. and make a pamphlet about what jobs are out there. This would be a great research project.

Discussion Questions: 

  • Before reading: What jobs do you know of that include working with animals?; After reading: Add to the list.
  • Which job do you think would work the best with your personality and work ethic?
  • Any jobs that you are interested in that weren’t in the book?
  • Why do you think the author chose to write each section in 1st person?
  • Why do you think the author wrote this book?
  • Compare/contrast two of the jobs in the book.

Flagged Passages: 

Read This If You Love: Aninimals

Recommended For: 

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**Thank you to Lynn at Kane Miller for providing a copy for review!**

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If you are anything like us right now, you are quietly panicking a bit. Our young children (three, in Ricki’s case) are home for quite a while, and they cannot go to public places. This is different from the summer because…they cannot go to public places. Our parenting strategy is always to keep them busy. Our kids thrive on trips to the playground, visiting museums, play dates, etc. When we keep ourselves busy, everyone does well.

We know that online learning content offers a lot for kids. We did some hunting, and we found some screen-time options that offer great educational content. Luckily for us all, there are many generous people and companies offering educational opportunities for our kids. We’re sharing the list below and invite you to share other options! Something we are trying to remember—this will hopefully be a short time period. We all hope this passes quickly. In the meantime, we are all going to do the best that we can. Solidarity with the parents and guardians out there. <3 BE WELL!

There are some incredible authors who are doing LIVE (yes, LIVE!) readings and doodle alongs of their books. We are, quite frankly, blown away and in awe of these authors. Ricki’s and Kellee’s children are loving so many of these! Here’s amazing opportunities (some available for a limited time) for our children/students as we move to digital/distance learning:

Read Alouds

Mac Barnett, author of EXTRA YARN, SAM AND DAVID DIG A HOLE, THE TERRIBLE TWO, Shapes Series; THE TERRIBLE TWO, and so many more!

Mac is reading is books in order of publication, and he has over 40 books. We will be watching him every single day! He’s quite entertaining! Follow him on Instagram* to watch live at 12pm PST or watch the video within 24 hours! He recommends that kids wear a hat, and he answers questions at the end.

Oliver Jeffers, author of STUCK, LOST AND FOUND, The Boy Series, THE INCREDIBLE BOOK EATING BOY, ONCE UPON AN ALPHABET, HERE WE ARE, and so many more!

At 2pm EST and 11am PST starting on Monday, Oliver Jeffers will read one of his books every weekday on Instagram* Live and talk about “some of the things that went into making it.” He talks about what he was thinking when he made each book, which is really neat to learn. He is archiving the videos on his website.

Kate Messner, author of the Over and Under Series, Ranger in Time Series, HOW TO READ A STORY, and so many more!

Kate Messner, who is always an ally to educators!, has put together a list of resources for us: “Read, Wonder, and Learn! Favorite Authors & Illustrators Share Resources for Learning Anywhere–Spring 2020” which includes so many videos, activities, and other resources!

She has also gotten permission from her publisher to do read alouds on her You Tube Channel! Including the upcoming OVER AND UNDER THE RAINFOREST which doesn’t come out until August!

More read alouds available:

Greg Pizzoli is hosting the Standby Book Club on weekdays at 11am ET on Instagram* Live.

Josh Funk has announced that on his Facebook he will be doing Saturday read louds.

On her You Tube channel, Laurel Snyder read aloud her newest Charlie and Mouse book and included an activity at the end. When finished, she is also reading from her picture books.

Debbie Ridpath Ohi is doing daily read alouds and drawings on You Tube.

Dan Gutman is reading from his books on his Facebook page.

K.A. Holt is reading from House Arrest on her YouTube channel.

Peter H. Reynold is doing read alouds on his Facebook page.

Julie Falatko is doing read alouds on Instagram* Live.

Megan Lacera is hosting storytimes on Twitter.

School Library Journal published an article on the 16th: “Kid Lit Authors Step Up to Help Educators, Students, and Parents”

Josh Gad is reading books on this Twitter and Instagram* accounts.

The Atlantic White Shark Conservancy is going to do Shark Story Hour every day this week at 10am on Facebook Live! (Available to watch later in the day as well!)

Storyline Online has videos of celebrities reading their favorite picture books.

There is a Google Doc that is also keeping track of author read alouds and activities.

There are read aloud opportunities for older kids, too!

Audible is offering limited free audiobooks while school is out!

Laurie Halse Anderson is promoting the #QuarantRead book club on Twitter where all ages may ask her questions.

On her YouTube channel, Kathy Burnette is reading Tracey Baptiste’s THE JUMBIES and hopes to read more after that.

Grace Lin is doing read alouds from her books on You Tube.

Kenneth Oppel is doing daily read alouds from his books on You Tube.

Dan Gemeinhart is doing a Coyote Sunrise Book Club & Read Aloud on You Tube.

On Facebook and You Tube, Neal Shusterman is going to do a Storyman Virtual Reading Series reading some of his less well-known short stories. He’ll be posting two or three times a week.

At-Home with Kwame Alexander includes many videos including a reading of Crossover that has been added during the quarantine.

Other Amazing Literacy Resources for All Ages

As we’re moving to digital learning for our country, there has been a lot of questions about copyright behind educators recording themselves reading texts to their classes. In this tumultuous time, publishers have kindly banded together and are giving guidelines for fair use for online storytimes and read-alouds during COVID-19 school closures.

Here’s an article from School Library Journal about the adapted policies publishers are putting forth to help educators.

Dan Santat has created the SANTAT ONLINE SURVIVAL SCHOOL FOR THE PANDEMIC #DANDEMIC! He’ll be sharing lessons on Instagram, and all lessons are available in a Drop Box as well.

Josh Funk has many activities on his website for his books.

Jarrett Lerner has activities such as “Finish the comic” on his website.

Grace Lin is starting a new podcast called Kids Ask Authors which debuted this week!

Penguin Teen has a podcast called We Are YA, and they have added new episodes called The Check In, starting with Randy Ribay.

Check out Storytime From Space where astronauts read books from the ISS.

11 Free Reading Websites for Kids

Log into Kanopy or Libby (Overdrive) and download free books (provided by libraries).

The New York Times provides daily writing prompts for free for students.

Kids can write to Pete the Cat!

Publishers Weekly posted a story on how the kid lit community responded in our time of need.

Penguin Random House Audio is offering a collection of free audiobook downloads for teachers and parents with kids home from school – or anyone looking for a great story right now. The free “Listen at Home” collection of classic titles is accessible via Penguin Random House Audio’s Volumes app (through 4/30).

Time for Kids has released their entire Digital Library free for the rest of the school year.

Also, amazing news: Kid Lit Authors are joining together and organizing a virtual book festival for May called Everywhere Book Fest.

Follow #CandlewickClassroom on social media to see videos including #WriteWithKate, weekly writing prompts and tips from Kate DiCamillo, from Kate DiCamillo. Candlewick is also hosting Instagram Live events, including My First Book Club Live with Shannon and Dean Hale talking about Princess in Black. Also, they have a You Tube playlist called Stay Home with Candlewick Press which have short and fun educational videos.

And don’t forget publishers always have amazing educator guides for us to use!

Abrams: https://www.abramsbooks.com/academic-resources/teaching-guides/

Bloomsbury: https://www.bloomsbury.com/us/communities/teachers-librarians/teaching-and-study-guides/

Candlewick: https://www.candlewick.com/authill.asp?b=Author&pg=1&m=actlist&audssmenu=0200&pix=n

Chronicle: https://www.chroniclebooks.com/ (search for the book and look at available resources)

Cinco Punto Press: https://www.cincopuntos.com/teacher_resources.sstg

Disney Books: https://books.disney.com/educator-teacher-guides/

HarperCollins: https://harperstacks.harpercollins.com/resources/

Lee & Low: https://www.leeandlow.com/educators/teacher-s-guides

Macmillan: https://us.macmillan.com/educators/

Peachtree: https://peachtree-online.com/resources/teachers-guides-event-kits/

Penguin: https://www.penguin.com/school-library/teaching-guides-activity-kits/

Random House: https://www.rhteacherslibrarians.com/resources/

Simon & Schuster: https://www.simonandschuster.net/search/books/_/N-m2sl

Sourcebooks: https://www.sourcebooks.com/librarian-educator-resources.html

Guides we’ve shared here on Unleashing Readers: http://www.unleashingreaders.com/?s=guides&submit.x=0&submit.y=0 http://www.unleashingreaders.com/?s=educator+guide

**Please note: This is just a small sampling of all of the amazing publisher resources out there!

Doodle Alongs

Ben Clanton, Author of the Narwhal and Jelly Book Series, BOO WHO?, and so many more!

Ben Clanton will be reading and drawing Tuesday and Friday this week. Our kids are very excited for this one.

Note: Now that these FB Live events have passed, Ben is moving to Instagram* Live each Monday at 12:30pm ET.

Jarrett J. Krosoczka, author of the Lunch Lady Series, HEY KIDDO!, and so many more!

At 2pm ET, Jarrett will be doing a live webcast! And since it is on his You Tube channel, if you cannot watch live, they will be archived. We cannot wait to see what Jarrett will teach us to draw!

Mo Willems, author of the Elephant & Piggie Series, Pigeon Series, Knuffle Bunny Trilogy, and so many more!

Mo Willems is hosting a lunch doodle each day at 1pm ET. “Learners worldwide can draw, doodle and explore new ways of writing by visiting Mo’s studio virtually once a day for the next few weeks. Grab some paper and pencils, pens, or crayons and join Mo to explore ways of writing and making together.”

More Art-Focused Activities

These coloring pages from some of our favorite illustrators.

Access Art for Kids Hub for basic drawing videos for kids!

Many museums are offering virtual tours including the 12 shared in this article.

@MrsVelazquezArt has created a guide to art at home!

A wonderful blog that focuses on learning through play with lots of crafts and art activities is LearnCreateLove.

Crayola is hosting online seminars about creative thinking and learning. They also always have online resources to add creativity to your kids’ lives.

Disney’s YouTube channel includes #DrawWithDisneyAnimation!

Art Time Today with retired Elementary Art Teacher and Arts Ed Professor Cheryl Smith includes lessons for all ages of kids!

STEM-Related Activities

Zoologist, artist, and author Jess Keating is releasing Keating Creature Activity Pages with a new creature featured on each one!

Visit the Cincinnati Zoo at 3pm ET/1pm MST Live where they highlight an animal each day on Facebook Live and include an activity to do. (Available to watch later in the day, as well).

Find a science-related video at Mystery Science! (Free memberships with some content available).

The Shirley Journal blog created a 30 day LEGO Challenge calendar!

This doc shares Engineering Activities for Kids (when under quarantine).

The Georgia Aquarium has live webcams for their exhibits, so you can go under the sea at home.

Code.org is a nonprofit focused on getting computer science to every kid!

Mass Audubon has many resources including nature BINGO.

Kiwi Co., a company that has STEM focused monthly subscription boxes, is now updating their At-Home Resources for Kids (and their grownups) daily to help with STEM activities while schools are closed.

Oceans Initiative, whale experts from Seattle, have shared a free, virtual marine biology camp to entertain and inform kids while schools are closed.

MakerMaven has shared resources for distance learning including STEAM challenges and other STEM Resources.

The Orlando Science Center has created OSC At Home: Resources and Activities for Engagement and Education While at Home.

Ripley’s Aquariums has an At Home page which has Live Events including storytimes, Q&As, and more; Educational Materials; and Live Streams.

Sea World has so much to offer: Animal Info Books, Classroom Activities, Teacher’s Guides, Saving a Species video series, and Animal Bytes.

History and Social Studies Related

The Erie Canal History Museum has provided the public with a virtual tour on You Tube and Educational Resources.

Travel the world with Travel Kids.

[Canadian] “Indigenous educators volunteer to teach short K-8 lessons online amid school closures”

Little Passports, a company that has social studies focused monthly subsrciption boxes, has opened up their activities for fun learning at home to all.

Physical Education

Do some Cosmic Kids Yoga with the kids.

Virtual dance lessons for kids or the Just Dance Kids videos are uploaded on this account!

Music

There are live virtual concerts that are available to watch during the shutdown.

Multiple Curriculum Lessons

Scholastic has rolled out FREE! Learn At Home lessons that are very easy to follow Scholastic lesson plans (book, video, discussion questions)! They also shared that more will be coming.

PBS Learning Media has curated standards-aligned videos, interactives, lesson plans, and more for educators, and PBS Digital Studios has a ton of content in many different content areas.

Other Fantastic Learning Explorations

Our friend Jenny Seiler has put together an Edu Resources Padlet with lots of resources as well–it is separated by type of experience and is continuously being added to!

Join Miss Megan’s Camp Kindergarten for Morning Meeting (ages 3-7)! Videos are posted to the website and can be accessed whenever you are eating breakfast!

Join Mr. Jon and Friends weekday mornings live for musical fun at 10:30am EST/ 7:30am MST (or watch later on the page).

Try out a free kids’ recipe from Raddish Kids.

Go on a virtual field trip including 30 National Parks!

There is this great list of 150+ Enrichment Activities for children while their parents work remotely.

Zoom is being kind and allowing their service for free! Zoom will easily allow anyone to have face to face meetings. And a kind educator created a document for instructions for students/kids.

Learn in Color, another education-focused blog, has compiled “75+ Entertaining and Educational Activities for When You’re Stuck Indoors” including a BINGO card to complete with the activities.

We Are Teachers is a fantastic resource for many resources including lists of podcasts, TED Talks, online learning resources, and, like us, they have curated a list of authors doing online reading and activities.

Disney and Kennedy Space Center are offering free online activities, such as Facebook Live events and imagineering in a box, for kids during school closures.

* Please note: Instagram Live recordings can be watched for 24 hours after the
recording before they expire, and they have to be watched from your phone.

What are some ideas that you’ve found? Share them in the comments! We are in this together. <3

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journeys and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Kellee and Jen, of Teach Mentor Texts, decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

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Tuesday: Eat the Cake by M.H. Clark, Illustrated by Jana Glatt

Sunday: Author Guest Post and Giveaway!: “Something Old, Something New: Five Classics Reimagined as Middle-Grade Books” by Erin Yun, Author of Pippa Park Raises Her Game

Published Late Sunday Night (Due to the Urgency of Educational Needs): Stuck Inside? Live Author Read-Alouds and Other Online Learning Options

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

  • After meeting Cyndy Etler at ALAN this last year, I wanted to read everything she’d written, and this week I jumped in by reading The Dead Inside which was the first memoir she wrote. It looks at her abuse-filled childhood including her stay at Straight, Inc., a brainwashing, cult-like rehab for teens. This book brought about a spiral of internet reading for me as well, and WOW what a terrible thing that existed (and was supported) here in the U.S. I’m so glad that Cyndy made it through and is now working with teens the right way!
  • I also read I’m Not Dying With You Tonight which is another book I’d wanted to read since ALAN. I loved meeting Kimberly and Gilly, and I was intrigued by the story that they told. This book deserves all the fans that it has because I could not put it down! I loved all the no-holds-barred truth in it.
  • Just Like Mama by Alice Faye Duncan is a beautiful book and all elementary teachers and librarians need to have it in their collection because it shows a positive fostering relationship which is very rarely shown in picture books. And with Duncan’s lyrical writing and Charlene Pinkney Barlow’s beautiful artwork, this is not only a good but very much needed book. And I love the note at the end from the author: “As a schoolteacher working in an urban environment with all of its complications, I have witnessed great success stories, I know countless grandmothers, aunts, big sisters who did not retreat – who valiantly cared for children not their own…I wrote Just Like a Mama to celebrate fictive kin, adoptive parents and guardians who have chosen to love and care for a child when they have no obligation to do so.” Just a beautiful book all around.
  • With Trent:
    • We are now on our last Princess in Black book after finishing #5 and #6 this week. I love the little lessons among the fun in each book.
    • See Fred Run and Itchy Book were both read to me by Trent this week!
    • The other books were all library picks by Trent!

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2020 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

I am devoting my energy to preparing a post for read-alouds for those of us stuck inside!

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Kellee

  • Reading: Unbound by Neal Shusterman
  • Listening: A Tale of Magic by Chris Colfer
  • Reading with Trent: The Princess in Black and the Bathtime Battle by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale, Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

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Monday 9am ET: Stuck Inside? Live Author Read-Alouds and Other Learning Options

Thursday: That’s A Job?: I Like Animals…What Jobs are There? by Steve Martin, Illustrated by Roberto Blefari

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “Learning STEM Through Stories” by S. Kitanovic, Author of Esie Explores Beneficial Bacteria

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Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

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“Something Old, Something New: Five Classics Reimagined as Middle-Grade Books”

There’s something utterly compelling about reimaginings. It’s like meeting up with an old friend many years down the road—the familiar elements of the original are comforting even as the fresh twists and changes bring delight. When I was a kid, I used to go through phases where I was obsessed with certain books for months at a time, so finding reimagined stories were a perfect way for me to explore a single novel with endless iterations. Plus, retellings help introduce young readers to books they’ll likely encounter in high school. So, whether you’re looking for a new way to relive a favorite novel, trying to spark a kid’s interest in a book for later down the road, or simply seeking an amazing story, look no further than these five reimagined middle-grade books based on classic literature.

Midsummer’s Mayhem by Rajani LaRocca

Mimi comes from a big Indian American family and is used to feeling overshadowed by her talented older siblings. So, when a newly opened bakery hosts a baking competition, Mimi enters, determined to prove herself. Soon, her dad is consuming everything in sight, boys are obsessing over her older sister, and wild boars are popping up in the forests of Massachusetts. Full of both literal and figurative charm, this retelling of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream is simply delicious . . . and had my mouth watering the entire time.

The Great Shelby Holmes by Elizabeth Eulberg

There is no shortage of Sherlock Holmes adaptions that exist—and for a good reason. There’s something so intriguing about the aloof detective with almost unbelievable powers of observation. In Eulberg’s take, Shelby Holmes might be able to solve any case in Harlem, but learning how to make a friend is one challenge that eludes the tiny sleuth. Told from the perspective of her new neighbor, John Watson, this book features a case of dognapping and is a cute, fun addition to the world of Sherlock Holmes-inspired works.  

Grump by Liesl Shurtliff

Whether or not you’re a fan of Snow White, you’re bound to enjoy the story of Borlen, a grumpy dwarf who dreams of living above ground. Readers will find themselves sympathetic toward Borlen even when he makes mistakes—such as entangling himself with the deceptively sweet Queen Elfrieda Veronika Ingrid Lenore (if only Borlen had noticed the acronym . . .). Plus, those who aren’t Snow White’s biggest fans will be delighted to find this Snow White is full of personality—a little bit bratty, but plenty charming, with the ability to make even a nickname like “Grump” sound endearing.

More to the Story by Hena Khan

Seventh grader Jameela Mirza aspires to be an award-winning journalist, so when she’s made features editor of her school newspaper, she’s delighted—despite clashing with the editor-in-chief, who continually strikes down her ideas. Even as Jameela struggles to make an article her Baba will be proud of, she must deal with his absence overseas and with her younger sister’s sudden illness. Inspired by Little Women and featuring a Pakistani American Muslim family living in modern-day Georgia, this heartfelt book shines due to Jameela’s realistic relationships (whether they be with her friends or family).

The Inquisitor’s Tale by Adam Gidwitz

Drawing parallels to The Canterbury Tales, The Inquisitor’s Tale begins in the year 1242 in a packed French inn, where, with the help of various patrons, we hear the story of three miraculous children: Jeanne, a peasant who receives visions; William, a monk with unnatural strength; and Jacob, a Jewish boy with healing powers. Gidwitz’s writing is filled with flecks of humor, and readers will delight in zany adventures (like curing a farting dragon) even as more serious stakes keep them flipping pages. Plus, the aesthetic of the book is just as rewarding as the prose—with beautifully stylized chapter openers, unique border art, and black-and-white images scattered throughout.

Published February 4th, 2020 by Fabled Films Press

About the Book:Readers will cheer on Korean American Pippa Park in this compelling middle grade reimagining of Great Expectations. Navigating friendships and cyberbullying at a new school, Pippa reinvents herself and discovers who she really is.

Life is full of great expectations for Korean American Pippa Park. It seems like everyone, from her family to the other kids at school, has a plan for how her life should look. So when Pippa gets a mysterious basketball scholarship to Lakeview Private, she jumps at the chance to reinvent herself by following the “Rules of Cool.”

At Lakeview, Pippa juggles old and new friends, an unrequited crush, and the pressure to perform academically and athletically while keeping her past and her family’s laundromat a secret from her elite new classmates. But when Pippa begins to receive a string of hateful, anonymous messages via social media, her carefully built persona is threatened.

As things begin to spiral out of control, Pippa discovers the real reason she was admitted to Lakeview and wonders if she can keep her old and new lives separate, or if she should even try.

Bonus Content: Discussion Questions, Author Q&A, and Korean Language Glossary and Pronunciation Guide

“Pippa is a magnetic heroine, funny and good-hearted.”―Booklist

About the Author:Debut author Erin Yun grew up in Frisco, Texas. She received her BFA in English from New York University and served as president of its policy debate team. This experience came in handy for her job as the debate consultant for the Tony-nominated Best Play on Broadway—What the Constitution Means to Me. Erin is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and has written reviews and articles for BookBrowse. She currently lives in New York City, and yes—she used to play basketball as a middle grader!

Connect with Fabled Films Press and Pippa Park:

www.fabledfilms.com | www.pippapark.com

Twitter: @fabled_films | Author on Twitter: @ErinMYun

Facebook: @Fabled.Films.Press | Instagram: @fabled.films

Language Arts Educators Guide: https://pippapark.com/resources

Giveaway!

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Thank you, Erin, for sharing these fun retellings and introducing us to Pippa!

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Eat the Cake
Author: M. H. Clark
Illustrator: Jana Glatt
Published February 1, 2020 by Compendium

Summary:It’s your day to be wild and fearless and free. It’s your day for becoming the next thing you’ll be. Though today is your party, it doesn’t stop here–it should keep right on going and last you all year.

Roll out the streamers, blow up the balloons, and celebrate all the great things that are coming your way! With its colorful cast of characters, delightfully detailed illustrations, and playful rhymes, this festive book will ignite good feelings for birthdays and any occasion where cake is appropriate. (And cake is always appropriate!) A fun and joyfilled gift for anyone ages 5 to 105. Features a hardcover with embossing.

Review: We all need to celebrate ourselves! This book gives readers the perfect excuse to do so! This is a very motivational text that reminds readers all of the reasons that they should be proud and happy to be themselves. Readers will come away from this book wanting to try new things and go to new places. This book would make a WONDERFUL gift to readers of all ages. Folks tend to buy the Oh, the Places You’ll Go book, but Eat the Cake offers something new and fresh (and something that another relative might not buy!). 

Teachers’ Tools for Navigation: If I was still teaching K-12 and had the means to do so, I would buy this book for every single one of my students at graduation. It would make a wonderful read aloud for the last day. I don’t think I could read this to my exiting students without crying! I will be purchasing this treasure for my graduate assistants. 🙂

Book Spreads! Book Spreads!:

Read This If You Loved: Oh, the Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss, Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast by Josh Funk, Inspirational Books

Recommended For:

  classroomlibrarybuttonsmall 

**Thank you to Compendium for providing a copy for review!!**

And we conclude with a PARTY!:

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? From Picture Books to YA!

It’s Monday! What are you Reading? is a meme started by Sheila at Book Journeys and now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date. It is a great way to recap what you read and/or reviewed the previous week and to plan out your reading and reviews for the upcoming week. It’s also a great chance to see what others are reading right now…you just might discover the next “must-read” book!

Kellee and Jen, of Teach Mentor Texts, decided to give It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? a kidlit focus. If you read and review books in children’s literature – picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, anything in the world of kidlit – join us! We love this meme and think you will, too.

We encourage everyone who participates to support the blogging community by visiting at least three of the other book bloggers that link up and leave comments for them.

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Tuesday: Old Rock (is Not Boring) by Deb Pilutti

Thursday: Bob Ross: My First Book of Colors by Robb Pearlman, Illustrated by Bob Ross

Sunday: Authors Guest Post!: “Books That Build Empathy” by Debut MG and YA Authors of 2020

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

NEAL SHUSTERMAN CAME TO MY SCHOOL THIS WEEK, and it was amazing! Check out my school’s FB post to see more pictures 🙂 (Also, he read from 2 upcoming books, and WOW! I cannot wait!)

  • I finished listening to A Match Made in Mehendi and I am in love with Simi’s story! Her friends and family are amazing! I highly recommend this well-crafted and well-written early YA romance!
  • I finally read Pumpkinheads by Rainbow Rowell and Faith Erin Hicks, and YAY for Deja representing real girls! And Josiah is just exactly what I hope all men will realize is the best way to be!
  • I also read a Free Comic Book Day Owly & Friends comic for fun! I just needed some Owly in my life this week.
  • With Trent:
    • More Fly Guy this week! He is now able to pretty much read any Fly Guy book himself, and I love to have him read to me!
    • With Princess in Black, we’ve moved to the ones I haven’t read, so I love seeing her new adventures too!
    • It was Read Across America week, and his teacher celebrated in the traditional way, and Trent says his favorite Dr. Seuss book was Horton Hears a Who, so he checked it out from his school library for us to read at home too.
    • Trent receives Powell’s Boox (book box) monthly from his g’rents, and this month we received In a Jar by Deborah Marcero and Twig by Aura Parker. He liked both of them, but Twig has already been read multiple times and seems to be a new favorite.

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2020 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

I have spent approximately 100 hours arranging all of the pitches for the ALAN Workshop program. I am excited to say that I am ready to pitch back to the publishers (following NCTE session acceptances and following approval from the program consultants). This means I have not been reading as much…as in at all. It feels a bit ironic, no? But I DID read Eat the Cake, which is a very fun text (review to come tomorrow), and I DID read to my boys each night. We are almost finished with the first Harry Potter!

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Kellee

  • Reading: I’m Not Dying with You Tonight by Kimberly Jones & Gilly Segal
  • Reading (a story here and there): Darkness Creeping: Twenty Twisted Tales by Neal Shusterman
  • Listening: A Tale of Magic by Chris Colfer
  • Reading with Trent (between other books): The Princess in Black and the Mysterious Playdate by Shannon Hale & Dean Hale, Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

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Tuesday: Eat the Cake by M.H. Clark, Illustrated by Jana Glatt

Sunday: Author Guest Post and Giveaway!: “Something Old, Something New: Five Classics Reimagined as Middle-Grade Books” by Erin Yun, Author of Pippa Park Raises Her Game

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Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

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“Books that Build Empathy”

Books have the power to let us walk in someone else’s shoes—and to make us more empathetic to other people’s lived experiences in the world as we walk that path. Several authors whose books will be debuting in 2020 discussed the books that changed them, that made them cry, and that made them more empathetic to other people’s lives and struggles.

Where the Red Fern Grows

Against the backdrop of the Ozarks, ten-year old Billy raises two puppies into hunting dogs who grow to love and protect him at all costs. This classic read impacted several of the debut authors this year. Kit Rosewater, author of the forthcoming The Derby Daredevils, admits to secretly reading ahead when the book was assigned in school—and coming into class already an emotional wreck. “I was sobbing when we were still five pages out, to the point where the teacher sent me outside to catch my breath in the hall.” And Tanya Guerrero, author of How to Make Friends with the Sea, admits to “sobbing for an entire week” after reading this deeply moving tale. The book showed Guerrero “the power of great storytelling” and how close we can feel to the characters who come to life on the pages of a book.

About The Derby Daredevils: Kenzie Kickstarts a Team: Kenzie and Shelly have been best friends for as long as they can remember. They hang out at the park, practice their super-secret handshake, and (most important) count down the days to their roller derby debut. It looks like their dream is coming true when Austin’s city league announces a junior league. But there’s a catch. To try out together, the Dynamic Duo will have to form a team of five players… in just one week!

As they start convincing other girls that roller derby is the coolest thing on wheels, Kenzie has second thoughts. Why is Shelly acting like everyone’s best friend? Isn’t she supposed to be Kenzie’s best friend? And things get really awkward when Shelly recruits Kenzie’s neighbor (and secret crush!) for the team.

About Kit Rosewater: Kit Rosewater writes books for children. Before she was an author, Kit taught theatre to middle school students, which even a world-renowned cat herder once called “a lot of work.” Kit has a master’s degree in children’s literature. She lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico with her spouse and a border collie who takes up most of the bed.

About How to Make Friends with the Sea: Pablo is homesick.

He’s only twelve years old, but he’s lived in more countries than he can count. After his parents divorced, he and his mother have moved from place to place for years, never settling anywhere long enough to call it home. And along the way, Pablo has collected more and more fears: of dirt, of germs, and most of all, of the ocean.

Now they’re living in the Philippines, and his mother, a zoologist who works at a local wildlife refuge, is too busy saving animals to notice that Pablo might need saving, too. Then his mother takes in Chiqui, an orphaned girl with a cleft lip―and Pablo finds that through being strong for Chiqui, his own fears don’t seem so scary.

He might even find the courage to face his biggest fear of all…and learn how to make friends with the sea.

About Tanya Guerrero: Tanya Guerrero is Filipino and Spanish by birth, but spent her childhood living in three continents—Asia, Europe and North America. Upon graduating from high school, she attended Boston University, where she studied Screenwriting. Over the course of eleven years, she’s worked as a photo editor in children’s educational publishing, operated her own photo studio and freelanced as a writer.

Currently, she lives in a shipping container home in the suburbs of Manila with her husband, her daughter, Violet, and a menagerie of rescued cats and dogs. In her free time she grows her own food, bakes sourdough bread and reads lots of books.


Bridge to Terabithia

One of the most impactful books to the debut authors of 2020 was Bridge to Terabithia, the story of the friendship between neighbors Jesse and Leslie, and their escape into a magical forest realm where they are able to assert the independence and adventure but find emotional sanctuary. KayLynn Flanders, author of the forthcoming Shielded admits to this being one of the first books she ever truly sobbed after reading. And Tanya Guerrero admits to an equal amount of suffering and sadness upon reading. But although the book deals with intense grief and loss, the story and the fantastic realm of Terabithia offered much more. Flanders shares that “while [Terabithia] gutted me in fifth grade, my friends and I were inspired by it. Every recess, we’d cross part of the playground into our own Terabithia, with new adventures awaiting us every day.” The best books deal with the hardest things in life, but they also give us pathways to endure them.

About Shielded: For fans of Sorcery of Thorns and Furyborn comes a thrilling new fantasy about a kingdom ravaged by war, and the princess who might be the key to saving not only those closest to her, but the kingdom itself, if she reveals the very secret that could destroy her.

The kingdom of Hálendi is in trouble. It’s losing the war at its borders, and rumors of a new, deadlier threat on the horizon have surfaced. Princess Jennesara knows her skills on the battlefield would make her an asset and wants to help, but her father has other plans.

As the second-born heir to the throne, Jenna lacks the firstborn’s—her brother’s—magical abilities, so the king promises her hand in marriage to the prince of neighboring Turia in exchange for resources Hálendi needs. Jenna must leave behind everything she has ever known if she is to give her people a chance at peace.

Only, on the journey to reach her betrothed and new home, the royal caravan is ambushed, and Jenna realizes the rumors were wrong—the new threat is worse than anyone imagined. Now Jenna must decide if revealing a dangerous secret is worth the cost before it’s too late–for her and for her entire kingdom.

About Kaylynn Flanders: KayLynn Flanders is a graduate of Brigham Young University, with a degree in English Language and a minor in editing. When she’s not writing, she spends her time playing volleyball, reading, and traveling. She lives in Utah with her family, and thinks there’s nothing better than a spur-of-the-moment road trip. Her debut novel is Shielded.


Little Women

Many writers empathize with the character of Jo—and with her loss of her manuscript at the hands of her jealous and angry little sister, Amy. But we empathize with Jo for more than that moment of loss—Lorien Lawrence, author of the forthcoming The Stitchers, remembers empathizing with Jo because she felt “like I didn’t fit in…I remember crying my eyes out in that last scene with Laurie.” She identifies what makes this book so eternal, and what we all hope for when we write characters—that we make them emblematic of the way we struggle with society’s expectations, with what and who we love, and how to navigate those wild. waters. In my forthcoming book, Wider Than the Sky, I explore just this type of relationship—and ask how we can navigate complex feelings of love and disdain, of adoration and fear. Little Women will always be an example of how we learn to care for others, even from within the complexities of our desires.

About The Stichers: Instinctive Quinn Parker and scientific-minded Mike Warren are two thirteen-year old friends who uncover a centuries-old-mystery that threatens their whole town. After learning the awful truth about their neighbors, ‘The Oldies’, and the gruesome secret of how they stay young, Quinn and Mike face a race against time to expose their neighbors before they become the next victims.

About Lorien Lawrence: Lorien Lawrence graduated with creative writing degrees from Wheaton College and Bath Spa University. After college, she lived abroad in England for a few years, before returning stateside and becoming a middle school English teacher. On weekends you can often find her exploring New England haunts, getting more inspiration for her novels.

About Wider Than the SkyWider Than the Sky follows the dual stories of twin sisters coping with the aftermath of their father’s sudden death. When their mother moves them to a ramshackle mansion in California, the twins discover that both parents were hiding secrets about their sexual identities

About Katherine Rothschild: Katherine Rothschild, MFA, PhD, is an English professor at St. Mary’s College, a former dance instructor, and an obsessive food truck-follower. Her first-person essays have been published by KQED/NPR and The San Francisco Chronicle, and her academic work is published by Purdue University Press. She has received artist grants from Vermont Studio Center and Kindlings Words. When she isn’t studying writing or classroom social justice, she’s hanging out by the lake with her family. Wider Than the Sky from Soho Teen is her debut young adult novel.


What books moved you, readers? What books made you more empathetic, more caring, more sensitive to others? What books can teach empathy?

Thank you to all the authors for sharing their choices and their upcoming books! Visit https://classof2k20books.com/ to learn more about these and all class of 2k20 authors and their books!

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