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At 11pm, I had the idea to teach my 6-year-old stop animation. I watched countless YouTube videos and tried to tailor them to his skill level. The next day went fairly well, but I learned some things along the way that I thought I’d share with other caregivers or educators embarking on this adventure.

  1. Create a Model, Show Examples/How-To Videos.

It is exceptionally hard to explain stop animation to a kindergartener. Thus, I showed many, many examples and then showed him my own example. I recommend pre-watching your examples because I found many inappropriate models that I was glad I ruled out in advance. I also found how-to videos that were way too intense for my kid. They would overwhelm him.

The first video I showed him was a LEGO animation (which I learned is called a brickfilm). The video I post below is very easy to follow and shows how it works:

Next, I showed a claymation, which is the clay form of stop animation. I watched many and found this one to be pretty clear:

And finally, I created my own (quick) model using clay. I left the clay model out, so I could explain how I did it. This was the quick model I made:

2. Use the “Stop Motion” App.

I learned (after watching many tutorials) that this app was not only very user-friendly but also very capable of advanced work (which we were not doing. The key to using the app is to avoid having to push the photo button. Every time you take a picture and touch the tablet/phone, it jiggles the camera a tiny bit. For the model above, I stacked five textbooks and hung the camera part of the tablet over the edge of the top book. This allowed me to set the automatic timer on the app and avoid touching the screen. I did everything flat on my table, as you will notice in the model.

Essentially, you set a timer for a certain length of time (I did five seconds for my model, but I set it to 15 seconds for my son.) In that time, you move your design slightly. If you miss the timer and don’t make the move, it is extremely easy to delete any of the frames in between.

My son chose to do a brick film with his legos, so I set up the tablet to lean against a chair leg. I had to remind him not to touch the chair, and I set the automatic timer. After that, he pretty much worked independently for an hour on his film.

3. Other Lessons Learned

There’s something that Stop Animators call “light flicker.” If you are close to a window, the changes in the sun (e.g. it goes behind a cloud) will make the light of your video flicker in each shot. Pros (my son and I not included), recommend doing your stop animation in a room with no sunlight or windows. You use two headlamps—one to put in front of your creation and one to put behind it for shadows. To remove the shine on the lego pieces, I learned that pros cover the front headlamp with parchment paper. This was way above our skill level. The pros also use professional cameras and not tablets/phones.

Stop animation takes time, but it takes far less time with this app. It is instantly rewarding to kids (at least, relatively to taking a lot of solo framed photos). It occupied my son for a good hour, and he got to play with his lego, so it was a fun time for him.

Don’t forget to add music. I got a bit lazy with mine, and I clicked the audio record option (which allows people to record their voices), and I just played a song through my cell phone to get it in the background. You can upload a song if you want better quality than mine.

Those are the basics. Kindergarteners are very capable of beginning stop animation films. My son’s ended up being a tray of his favorite minifigures. They appeared one-by-one, and then they disappeared one-by-one. It was a great first start for him!

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One Last Shot
Author: John David Anderson
Published May 5th, 2020 by Walden Pond Press

Summary: For as long as he can remember, Malcolm has never felt like he was good enough. Not for his parents, who have always seemed at odds with each other, with Malcolm caught in between. And especially not for his dad, whose competitive drive and love for sports Malcolm has never shared.

That is, until Malcolm discovers miniature golf, the one sport he actually enjoys. Maybe it’s the way in which every hole is a puzzle to be solved. Or the whimsy of the windmills and waterfalls that decorate the course. Or maybe it’s the slushies at the snack bar. But whatever the reason, something about mini golf just clicks for Malcolm. And best of all, it’s a sport his dad can’t possibly obsess over.

Or so Malcolm thinks.

Soon he is signed up for lessons and entered in tournaments. And yet, even as he becomes a better golfer and finds unexpected friends at the local course, be wonders if he might not always be a disappointment. But as the final match of the year draws closer, the tension between Malcolm’s parents reaches a breaking point, and it’s up to him to put the puzzle of his family back together again.

About the Author: John David Anderson is the author of some of the most beloved and highly acclaimed books for kids in recent memory, including the New York Times Notable Book Ms. Bixby’s Last Day, Granted, Sidekicked, and The Dungeoneers. A dedicated root beer connoisseur and chocolate fiend, he lives with his wonderful wife and two frawsome kids in Indianapolis, Indiana. He’s never eaten seven scoops of ice cream in a single sitting, but he thinks it sounds like a terrific idea. You can visit him online at www.johndavidanderson.org.

Q&A: Thank you so much to John David Anderson for answering these questions for us!

What was your inspiration for writing this novel?

One Last Shot is somewhat autobiographical in nature. As an adolescent once myself (so many eons ago) I can empathize with Malcolm’s (the protagonist’s) conflicts and concerns: the desire (or is it burden?) to please others, the need to find something you’re good at, anxiety over a potential parent split, the ache for a friend that just gets you—these are all feelings I struggled with as well. So think the emotional core of the book is definitely informed by my childhood.

At the same time, I literally just sat down one day and said, “I’m going to write a sports novel. Hold up…I don’t play sports! But I do play miniature golf. Wouldn’t it be cool if somebody—i.e. me–wrote a book about miniature golf and made it exactly eighteen chapters?” I think a lot of my stories start this way, as artistic challenges or experiments, though the real challenge is turning these exercises into full-fledged narratives.

Why mini golf?

Um…because it’s awesome! Honestly I picked mini-golf because it worked well as a metaphor for the coming-of-age story I was telling. On the one hand it’s so whimsical and random—windmills, barns, pirate ships—but at the same time its so methodical and predictable. It’s basic geometry. For Malcolm that’s appealing because it’s something he can control; it’s a problem with an easily discernable solution—the cup is right there. It’s also individualistic. Nobody is counting on him to catch the fly ball or safely get on base. His successes and failures are entirely his own—though that comes with its own pressures, of course.

Could you tell us some about your writing process?

Anyone who knows me already knows that chocolate is involved. Beyond that, though, it’s 6-8 weeks of pure writing fury followed by 6-8 months of torturous revision. My initial drafts are explorations—my editor says they are me laying out miles and miles of track hoping that it leads somewhere (it doesn’t always)— but the most important thing for me is to maintain momentum so I can push through the difficult middles to get to the rewarding ends. I just have to trust myself that the exhaustive revision process will bang all the pieces firmly into place, fashioning my mess of a first draft into something presentable.

I also have come to realize that the process never really stops. Even if I’m not in front of the laptop, I’m still writing. When I’m working on a novel my brain never fully steps out of that world. So much of the process happens in the ongoing dialogue I have with the characters inside my head (much like the voices Malcolm hears in his).

Of course this particular book afforded me the chance to do some fun hands-on research: I’ve visited my fair share of mini-golf courses in the last couple of years.

What is one thing you hope readers take away from ONE LAST SHOT?

The world is unpredictable. It throws obstacles at you right and left. You don’t get to make the course, you just have to play it.

But you also have more than one shot. Not everything is going to be a hole-in-one. You are going to doink off the rock or stick yourself in the corner or even hit it way too hard, somehow jump the wall and end up in the parking lot. But that’s okay. I want my readers to know its okay. You learn from your mistakes, and you take a better shot next time.

Readers’ Guide:

Blog Tour:

May 4   Nerdy Book Club
May 7   Teachers Who Read
May 8    A Library Mama
Kirsti Call
May 10 Bluestocking Thinking
May 12 Unleashing Readers
Maria’s Mélange
May 14 The Book Monsters

Giveaway!:

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**Thank you to Walden Pond Press for providing the Q&A and a copy for giveaway!**

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

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Tuesday: The Princess in Black and the Case of the Coronavirus by Shannon Hale & Dean Hale, Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Thursday: Review and Giveaway!: It Is (Not) Perfect by Anna Kang, Illustrated by Christopher Weyant
**Giveaway open until Thursday!**

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “Studying the Past, Writing the Future: Some Thoughts on the Study of History” by Todd Hasak-Lowy, Author of We Are Power: How Nonviolent Activism Changes the World

Updated Often: The Big List of Online Learning Resources for COVID-19 and Quarantine

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

  • Major Impossible by Nathan Hale: This is the first of Nathan Hale’s books where I knew nothing about the history of, and it was so interesting! Powell is such a fascinating character, and I want to learn even more about him! And I adore Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales and how he mixes the text structure and adds in so much humor in serious history.
  • Unicorn Theater by Dana Simpson: Pheobe and her Unicorn are some of my favorite comics to read to just feel happy, and this one definitely filled that want!
  • BenBee and the Teacher Griefer by K.A. Holt: “The Kids Under the Stairs: BenBee and the Teacher Griefer is a funny, clever novel-in-verse series about Ben Bellows—who failed the Language Arts section of the Florida State test—and three classmates who get stuck in a summer school class.
    But these kids aren’t dumb—they’re divergent thinkers, as Ms. J tells them: they simply approach things in a different way than traditional school demands.
    Each chapter is told through the perspective of one of the four students, who each write in a different style (art, verse, stream of consciousness).”
  • Lafayette by Nathan Hale: It was so much fun to read Lafayette’s story since I only knew aspects of his history from high school history class and Hamilton.
  • With Trent:
    • Miss Maple’s Seeds by Eliza Wheeler: What a beautiful story to read to celebrate spring. Read by Michelle Obama on her story time.
    • The Watermelon Seed by Greg Pizzoli: We’ve been watching Standby Book Club with Greg Pizzoli, but we kept missing this one. We were so glad that he reread it.
    • My Brother Charlie by Holly Robinson Peete: Such a sweet story about siblings, one with autism.
    • Much else of what we’re reading right now are either chapter books or rereads (primarily of Mac Barnett, Josh Funk, Kate Messner, or Oliver Jeffers books because we watch their storytimes!).
    • Trent has also been reading to us! This week he read Fox the Tiger  by Corey R. Tabor, Harold and Hot Pretend for Real by Dan Santat, and The Good for Nothing Button by Charise Mericle Harper.

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2020 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

The boys and I tried out the library’s overdrive because we were looking for some new books for the oldest to read aloud. The books we were looking for weren’t available, but we found a lot of amazing alternatives! How Many Jelly Beans? offered some great number sense. They loved the DC Super Friends: Bizarro Day and Star Wars Sith Wars books.

Our shared favorites were A Pig, A Fox, and a Box by Jonathan Fenske (very funny!) and The Doghouse by Jan Thomas. We’ve put holds on a few other books by these two authors but we may be in for a long wait.

My oldest loves anything history or autobiography, so he liked listening to Magic Treehouse’s Fact Tracker: Abraham Lincoln. We’ve read Hope’s Gift by Kelly Starling Lyons three times this week because he likes learning about the Civil War.

We’ve read other books in Stacy McAnulty’s companion series, but we hadn’t read Earth! yet. It was just as amazing as the others. This is one of our favorite science series.

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Kellee

  • Reading and Listening: I don’t know… I’ve been on a graphic novel kick to keep my engagement up, but who knows what I’ll turn to.
  • Listening with Trent: Unicorn Rescue Society: The Creature in the Pine by Adam Gidwitz (finishing this week for book club)
  • Reading with Trent: Rosie Revere and the Caucous Riveters by Andrea Beaty (starting for our other book club)

Ricki

We are going to explore the Kindle Overdrive options our library offers some more. The library is starting to offer curbside pickup in a week, and we may try to brave it and leave the books to settle for a few days before we open them up.

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Tuesday: Blog Tour with Q&A and Giveaway!: One Last Shot by John David Anderson

Thursday: Ricki’s Lessons Learned from Teaching my Kindergartener Stop Animation

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “Engaging Reluctant Readers” by Sarah S. Reida, Author of All Sales Final

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“Studying the Past, Writing the Future: Some Thoughts on the Study of History” 

Before I even finished co-writing Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote (Viking, 2018), I knew I wanted to write another book like it.  By “like it” mean:

A book of history for younger readers.

  • A book that tells the story of incredible, genuinely heroic, and underappreciated people.
  • A book that, despite its younger audience, still captures the nuance, complexity, and, above all, rich profundity of some important chapter from the past.

It took me many months, many long walks, and many conversations with many people before I stumbled upon the subject of nonviolence.  As had been the case with suffrage a few years before, I knew next to nothing about this topic, but as I began reading my way into it, I could tell that it would make for a great book.

There was a more specific link connecting the two projects as well: Alice Paul, who led the American women’s suffrage movement during the final decade of its long struggle.  I had grown utterly fascinated with the intense, truly radical, and somewhat mysterious Paul while working on Roses and Radicals.  As I began reading about nonviolence I came to understand that she herself was a nonviolent activist, even though only a tiny fraction of the scholarship about Paul views her work in this context.  So the writing of my book, We Are Power: How Nonviolent Activism Changes the World, would begin by retelling her story, yet again, but this time in order to establish her rightful place alongside Gandhi, MLK, and Cesar Chavez.

But as I did this, I learned that We Are Power would be crucially different than Roses and Radicals.  For one thing, it would tell more stories—and would thus require considerably more research.  More important, however, these stories would be tied together not by a common set of characters, a single movement, or a shared setting, but by the strategy of nonviolent activism itself.

In this regard, We Are Power is not only a book of history, but a book of political theory, or, more precisely, a book about a half-dozen instances of this political theory being put into dramatic, inspiring practice.  The book, as narrative, would be propelled by characters and conflicts, but the spine holding it all together would be the theory itself: the way nonviolence rethinks the very nature of political power and social change.

Unfortunately, I found this theoretical material, all on its own, dense, abstract, and, when read separately from the history, extremely dry and perhaps even boring.  I knew that the parts of my book dedicated directly to this theory would have to be brief or I’d lose my readers.  And yet, these parts, I learned as I wrote my various chapters, were in a sense the very point of the book.  As they were interwoven into the various narratives I was constructing, they often found their place in and around the climaxes to each story.

The historical events were, I realized, the occasion to present the timeless truths at the center of nonviolent activism.  This would explain why the title to my book of history—We Are Power: How Nonviolent Activism Changes the World—contains not one but two present tense verbs.  It also explains why the book is able to pivot, in its conclusion, from past movements to a present struggle—the fight against climate change—that is very much ongoing.

Ultimately, We Are Power isn’t a book of history, or only a book of history.  It’s a book about power and the way those who don’t appear to have power can claim it, in order to change the world in which they live.  The truth about power at the center of this book is timeless.

I don’t have a lesson, per se, to offer teachers here, but instead a rather large bit of advice I encourage teachers to keep in mind when working on history with their students: studying the past is worthwhile not because there’s value in knowing, all by itself, what happened in earlier times, but because understanding history helps us see our present more clearly.  This great, meta-historical truth needn’t receive a lot of attention in lessons, but it should be there, I believe, as an often-silent motivation for the entire enterprise.

Our responsibility to study the past is inseparable from our responsibility to apply what we learn to our actions in the present.  When we teach young people history, we’re giving them a crucial tool in becoming informed citizens capable of transforming our present into a better future, and I can think of no lesson more important than that.

Published April 7th, 2020 by Abrams Books for Young Readers

About the Book: Author Todd Hasak-Lowy’s We Are Power is a stirring introduction to nonviolent activism, from American women’s suffrage to civil rights to the global climate change movement.

What is nonviolent resistance? How does it work? In an age when armies are stronger than ever before, when guns seem to be everywhere, how can people confront their adversaries without resorting to violence themselves? Featuring leaders Gandhi, Alice Paul, Martin Luther King Jr., Cesar Chavez, Václav Havel, and Greta Thunberg, We Are Power brings to life the incredible movements that use nonviolent activism to change the world.

By answering the question “Why nonviolence?” and challenging the notion of who makes history and how, author Todd Hasak-Lowy shows the ways key movements have succeeded again and again in all sorts of places, using a variety of methods and against overwhelming odds. Breaking down nonviolent resistance into digestible lessons for next generation of activists, this book is an inspiring call to action, a reminder that true power ultimately rests in our hands.

We Are Power also includes an overview of other movements from the last one hundred years, a bibliography, and an index.

★ “Hasak-Lowy’s writing gives life to both the people and issues involved, taking time to explain historical backgrounds and the ways the lessons from one movement affected future ones.” — Booklist, STARRED REVIEW

★ “Highly recommended for its outstanding treatment of the history of social justice. A good resource for student activists.” — School Library Journal, STARRED REVIEW

★ “There has never been a time when a book is more relevant than this one.” — School Library Connection, STARRED REVIEW

“A striking and very timely conclusion highlights teenage Greta Thunberg’s bold challenge to fight global climate change.” — Publishers Weekly

“This excellent, timely overview will open eyes and deserves a wide readership.”— Kirkus

About the Author: Todd Hasak-Lowy is the author of several books for young readers, including the novels 33 Minutes and Me Being Me Is Exactly as Insane as You Being You. He is a professor in the department of liberal arts at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He lives in Evanston, Illinois, with his wife and two daughters. Visit his website at toddhasaklowy.com.

https://www.toddhasaklowy.com/
https://twitter.com/nonviolence11
https://www.instagram.com/wearepower_book/
https://www.facebook.com/todd.hasaklowy.1
https://www.abramsbooks.com/product/we-are-power_9781419741111/

Thank you, Todd, for this look at how history helps write the future: good and bad!

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It Is (Not) Perfect
Author: Anna Kang
Illustrator: Christopher Weyant
Expected publication: May 12th, 2020

Summary: Two fuzzy creatures are happily putting the finishing touches on their sandcastle when each of them thinks of something that would make it even better. As they work furiously to incorporate each new change, their tiny sandcastle becomes an over-the-top palace…but is it really perfect?

This latest book in the beloved series featuring the pals from Theodor Seuss Geisel Award winner You Are (Not) Small reminds us that perfection is in the eye—and heart—of the beholder.

Praise:

“Colorful cartoon illustrations add a lightheartedness to what could be a stressful real-life situation for kids. Another life lesson neatly packaged in child centric humor.” —Kirkus Reviews

“This award-winning duo have created a lovely tribute to the old adage that perfect is the enemy of good. Recommended for purchase for all collections.” —School Library Journal

About the Creators: Anna Kang and Christopher Weyant are the creators of Theodor Seuss Geisel Award winner You Are (Not) Small as well as series titles That’s (Not) Mine, I Am (Not) Scared, and We Are (Not) Friends. They also wrote and illustrated Eraser, Can I Tell You a Secret?, and Will You Help Me Fall Asleep? Christopher’s work can also be seen in The New Yorker, and his cartoons are syndicated worldwide. This husband-and-wife team lives in New Jersey with their two daughters and their rescue dog. Visit them at www.annakang.com and www.christopherweyant.com.

Twitter: @annakang27 @chrisweyant05
Instagram: annakangbookschristopherweyant
Facebook: Anna Kang – Author; Christopher Weyant

Review: This series is one of my favorites. Although the simplicity of the texts makes the books seem straightforward, they are actually multi-tiered and can be used for so many different ages to discuss illustrations as part of the narrative, moral issues, friendship, perspective, and much more. All while following the stories for two super cute monster friends!

Discussion Questions: 

  • What ended up actually being perfect?
  • What did trying to please all cause?
  • Who gets to decide what is perfect?
  • Does everything you do need to be perfect?
  • How did trying to make it perfect ruin the fun?

Flagged Passages: 

Read This If You Love: Not series by Kang and Weyant including You Are (Not) SmallThat’s (Not) MineI Am (Not) Scared, and We Are (Not) Friends; How to Code a Sandcastle by Josh Funk, Dexter series by Lindsay Ward including Don’t Forget Dexter and It’s Show and Tell, Dexter

Recommended For: 

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**Thank you to Blue Slip Media for providing a copy for review and giveaway!**

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The Princess in Black and the Case of the Coronavirus
Authors: Shannon Hale & Dean Hale
Illustrator: LeUyen Pham

Summary: The creators of the New York Times-bestselling series The Princess in Black – Shannon Hale, Dean Hale, and LeUyen Pham – have created an incredibly child-friendly coronavirus public service announcement, called The Princess in Black and the Case of the Coronavirus.

From Shannon Hale: LeUyen, Dean and I are all parents self-isolating at home with our children. The anxiety and distancing is hard enough on our older kids, but we know that younger kids might be having an even harder time. We hoped that it’d help if a familiar book friend like the Princess in Black talked them through it. Even the Princess in Black is staying home! Even Princess Sneezewort had to cancel playdates! LeUyen had the idea of creating a short comic to download and share widely so caregivers could have an extra tool for talking to kids. Our goal is both to help kids understand what’s going on and to help them feel less alone.

Available for all at: https://www.princessinblack.com/download/pib-coronavirus.pdf

Thoughts: This pandemic is a time that is very confusing for kids, and I am so excited that this story exists for my son and other kids!

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**Thank you to Candlewick Press for sharing this story with us!**

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?
Sharing Picture Books, Early Readers, Middle Grade Books, and Young Adult Books for All Ages!

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a weekly blog hop co-hosted by Unleashing Readers and Teach Mentor Texts which focuses on sharing books marketed for children and young adults. It offers opportunities to share and recommend books with each other.

The original IMWAYR, with an adult literature focus, was started by Sheila at Book Journeys and is now hosted by Kathryn at The Book Date.

We encourage you to write your own post sharing what you’re reading, link up below, leave a comment, and support other IMWAYR bloggers by visiting and commenting on at least three of the other linked blogs.

Happy reading!

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Updated Often: The Big List of Online Learning Resources for COVID-19 and Quarantine

Tuesday: Virtual Book Clubs with our Kids During Quarantine

Thursday: Abby in Oz and the Whatever After Series by Sarah Mlynowski

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “What Kids Can Do to Help the Environment and Why Does It Matter?” by Tracy Richardson, Author of The Field and Catalyst

**Click on any picture/link to view the post**

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Kellee

  • Doodleville by Chad Sell: What a fascinating graphic novel about come to life drawings which symbolize much more than they seem.
  • Book Love by Debbie Tung: I think Debbie Tung wrote this book for me. She is in my head! Funny is the “she gets me” kind of way.
  • What About Worms by Ryan T. Higgins: I cannot wait to see the finished book. The e-galley, I’m sure, doesn’t do it justice, but I know Trent is going to LOVE it.
  • Act by Kayla Miller: I cannot believe I haven’t read any of these titles yet–what a fun cast of characters! A great representation of middle school with a great story!
  • What We’ll Build by Oliver Jeffers: Oliver Jeffers is brilliant, and this book he wrote about his daughter fills my heart, and I cannot wait to see the finished book (he read it live on Instagram).
  • Unicorn Rescue Society: The Chupacabras of the Rio Grande by Adam Gidwitz and David Bowles: I just love this series. Period. Fun adventures, a diverse cast of characters and setting, mythology, and humor. Perfect.
  • They Called Us Enemy by George Takei: I am so glad that George Takei wrote this memoir. It is something that should not be forgotten in our history, specifically as it is being repeated  now. We cannot forget the story and people behind laws.
  • With Trent: Almost all of what we are reading is through authors’ virtual read alouds. It is such an amazing oppurtunity, I just don’t want Trent to miss out. This week, we went to virtual story times with: Josh Funk, Kate Messner, Peter Reynolds, Dolly Parton, Michelle Obama, and Mac Barnett.
    • He also had two great books focused on two amazing women read by his teachers this week: Shark Lady and Frida. 

To learn more about any of these books, check out my 2020 Goodreads Challenge page  or my read bookshelf on Goodreads.

Ricki

We read a lot of Elephant and Piggie (series by Mo Willems) this week. My 6-year-old has a lot of fun reading one part of the Elephant and Piggie books, so we went to town on the books. A neighbor lent us some of the books from her collection. We allowed them to sit for two days before we touched them, and then we read book after book (about three each night). He also read Stick and Stone by Beth Ferry to me (which I was able to access digitally). It was a great reading week, and we had a lot of fun with these books.

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Kellee

  • Reading: Lafayette by Nathan Hale
    • Nathan Hale is our author who is going to come to our school next year!
  • Listening: I haven’t decided what I want to listen to next as I wait for the 5th Unicorn Rescue Society book to be out in 8 days.
  • Listening with Trent: Unicorn Rescue Society: The Creature of the Pines by Adam Gidwitz (for book club)
  • Trent reading with Henry: Elephant and Piggie books during partner reading for their weekly book club

Ricki

I am on the quest for more books that feel comfortable and challenging for my son. He loves the Elephant and Piggie books. If anyone has any recommendations, I’d love to hear them!

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Tuesday: The Princess in Black and the Case of the Coronavirus by Shannon Hale & Dean Hale, Illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Thursday: Review and Giveaway!: It Is (Not) Perfect by Anna Kang, Illustrated by Christopher Weyant

Sunday: Author Guest Post: “Studying the Past, Writing the Future: Some Thoughts on the Study of History” by Todd Hasak-Lowy, Author of We Are Power: How Nonviolent Activism Changes the World

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Link up below and go check out what everyone else is reading. Please support other bloggers by viewing and commenting on at least 3 other blogs. If you tweet about your Monday post, tag the tweet with #IMWAYR!

 Signature andRickiSig