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top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Authors We Would Love to Meet

Ricki

I’ve been incredibly fortunate to have met some of my favorite authors. I highly recommend the NCTE conference and ALAN Workshop to people who want to meet their author rockstars. If you want to enjoy a glass of wine with them, definitely attend the ALAN Workshop! Here are the authors I haven’t met and would love to meet someday.

1. Kevin Brooks

I absolutely love Kevin Brooks’ books. I would love to have him at NCTE, but I think England is a bit far for him to travel.

2. R. J. Palacio

I simply adore her books and would love to meet her! Wonder had a powerful impact on my life.

3. Sandra Cisneros

It would be so lovely to meet this woman. The House on Mango Street is one of my favorite books of all time.

4. Josh Funk

Josh is an incredible (online) friend. Someday, we will meet in person. Josh, I just read your book to Henry tonight! We had a nice talk about some of the foods he doesn’t know very well.

5. John Steinbeck

Ah, I know it is cheating to put him on this list. But if I could go back in time, I would absolutely love to meet this man. He’s my idol.

Kellee

I didn’t know we were time traveling! 🙂 That would make this list even longer!

1. J.K. Rowling

Because she is J.K. Freaking Rowling!

2. Mo Willems

I saw Mo Willems once from afar at NCTE, but I missed his signing. I think his picture books are brilliant and so does Trent.

3. Gene Luen Yang

I loved Yang’s work before I knew as much about him as I do now. With him becoming the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, I’ve been able to see what is near and dear to his heart, and I think things like the “Reading Without Borders” challenge is brilliant, admirable, and important.

4. Kristin Levine

I am just in love with Lions of Little Rock, and I would love to tell Kristin that.

5. Deborah Wiles

Like Kristin, Deborah Wiles’s historical fiction just touches my heart in a way that is hard to explain. The one ALAN I missed, Deborah attended, so I need to remedy missing her!

Which authors would you love to meet?

RickiSig and Signature

 

top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Short Novels That Packed a Punch

Ricki

I prepped my list before I saw Kellee’s list and A Long Walk to Water and Stuck in Neutral were on my list! DANG!

1. Once by Morris Gleitzman

Felix’s parents left him in an orphanage in Poland. Three years and eight months later, it is 1942, and he still waits for them to come back. He is Jewish, but he knows he is supposed to keep this a secret–although he is not sure why. When he sees Nazis burning books in the orphanage yard, he worries about his parents, who are booksellers. Felix’s naive voice is heartbreaking, as he doesn’t understand what is going on in the world around him. This is a powerful book that I would recommend to middle school or upper-elementary school teachers. All in 149 pages.

2. The Stranger by Albert Camus

This book is one part bizarre and two parts incredible. It tells the story of a senseless murder and the unemotional man who tells the story of how it happened. I loved teaching this book because we had awesome conversations about absurdity and the meaning of life. All in 123 pages.

3. Night by Elie Wiesel

I suspect that most of the people reading this have experienced the power of this book. This Holocaust story will stick with me for the rest of my life. I’ve reading it at least fifty times, and I still get incredibly emotional when I read it. All in 120 pages.

4. The Giver by Lois Lowry

In Jonas’ community, every person’s spouse is chosen for them. They are assigned one boy and one girl as children, and they don’t feel any strong emotions, like love. At age 12, they are each assigned a job. When anyone deviates from the norm, they are sent “elsewhere.” This is a fantastic book that can be appreciated by people of all ages. Dystopian-lovers will enjoy it immensely. As I listened to it, I couldn’t help but ponder all of the themes that emerged. All in 180 pages.

5. Readicide by Kelly Gallagher

Gallagher does a phenomenal job balancing statistics to support his theory for why American schools are killing reading.The statistics and explanations are quite powerful. I read this book several years ago, and I still talk about it often. All in 160 pages.

Kellee

1. A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park

Linda Sue Park took a true story of a lost boy’s survival after being chased from his village because of war and transformed it into a novel that will leave the reader with a feeling of awe. Awe of the bravery and pure fearlessness of Salva and the other Lost boys of Sudan and awe of the world of riches and blindness we live in while a horrendous war wages on the other side of the world. All in 128 pages.

2. Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman

This book is terrifying and eye-opening. It helps the reader look past what they already know and realize they have to learn about people before making assumptions. It is terrifying because you don’t know what is going to happen and death awaits around every corner. Oh and it is a Printz Finalist. All in 114 pages.

3. Orbiting Jupiter by Gary D. Schmidt

In this perfect book about fostering, life, and family. Within these pages, you will fall in love with Joseph and Jack and hope for their success in life. But then tears. Lots of tears. All in 160 pages.

4. Some Writer!: The Story of E.B. White by Melissa Sweet

E.B. White is fascinating! Who would have know?! But Melissa Sweet tells us his life story, mixed with primary sources like White’s letters and photos, that will definitely make you want to pick up Charlotte’s Web and Stuart Little as well as pick up a pencil to write your own story. All in 176 pages.

5. Tales of Beedle the Bard by J.K. Rowling
(And the rest of the Hogwarts Library books)

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter texts are quite intense and long, but her books that make up the Hogwards Library set are quite small and add such depth to the mythology of Harry Potter’s world. My favorite is Tales of Beedle the Bard because it gives us more insight into the history of their world as well as Dumbledore. All in 109 pages.

Which small novels do you enjoy the most?

RickiSig and Signature

 

top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Reasons Why I Love Teaching Middle School

Kellee

1. They are trying to find their identity and are still moldable, so I feel like I can make a difference.

I love that I am part of these students’ lives during a very influential time. I know that elementary and high school are important as well, but I think it is iso important for kids between the ages of 11 and 14 to have positive influences in their life.

2. Middle grade books!

I love them! And I get a mix of picture books and young adult novels as well! Perfect!

3. Middle school is TOUGH, and I hope I can be a bright light in their days.

Think back to Middle School. Did you enjoy being 12? Most people say no, and most of us cannot think of a teacher who really helped brighten our days in middle school. I hope I can be that bright light that will help them remember this time in a positive way.

4. Teaching only 1 subject.

I love teaching reading. I have the ability to teach more subjects, but I love that I can just teach the one I am most passionate about.

5. The discussions we have over the world, books, or their life.

Middle school kids are so insightful, and I love the conversations we have. And I think sometimes no one listens to them, but they definitely have a voice and opinions and insight.

6. Working with teachers who are passionate about this age also (because only those who are passionate stay in MS).

Other people who are passionate about teaching are amazing to work with, but there is a special little niche in middle school for those of us who love this age. I adore working with these people.

7. Because middle school is a really fundamental time.
I’ve written a post before that showed how middle school really molded who I am today: http://www.unleashingreaders.com/?p=1625. This post and my time as a middle school teacher really show me that so much of who we become is found during the years of middle school

8. The inquisitiveness of elementary age kids + the ability of high school = middle school

I always joke that elementary school kids are too short for me to teach (they are out of my peripheral vision) and high schools are too jaded for me to teach, but all jokes aside, middle schoolers really do embody so much of what makes teaching fun. They are young enough that they are still open to learning and inquiry, but they are old enough that they think for themselves and have vast knowledge.

9. Because middle schoolers are still kids.

But they are still just kids!

10. The hours 😉 We’re 8:30-4. I am not a morning person, so that is really as early as I would like to go.

Self explanatory 🙂

Why do you love teaching/working with the age you do?

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top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Things We Love About ARCs

ARCs = Advanced Readers Copies (also known as galleys)

Ricki and Kellee

1. They scream for us to share them widely.

2. Sections occasionally change in the final version. This adds excitement!

3. The cover might even be quite different. We can either savor the old cover or get excited about the new one.

4. ARCs allow us to spread book love because when we purchase the published copy, we can share the ARC with others.

5. They are raw and might have a few editing errors. Correcting these errors in our heads makes us feel smart. 😉

6. They allow us to look like rock stars to our students because we know about books before they come out!

7. They make beautiful displays on the floors of exhibit halls.

8. Sharing an ARC of a favorite author with a friend is the greatest gift of all (and makes for a lot of warm and fuzzy feelings).

9. They allow us to look at the marketing plans. We can then pretend like we are in the know.

10. They make us feel like we are in on a secret—holding a magical book before its birthday. This certainly excites our students, too!

What do you love about ARCs?

RickiSig and Signature

 

top ten tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is an original feature/weekly meme created at The Broke and the Bookish. The feature was created because The Broke and Bookish are particularly fond of lists (as are we!). Each week a new Top Ten list topic is given and bloggers can participate.

 Today’s Topic: Ten Books I Wish Had More Pages in Them

Ricki

1. Ghost by Jason Reynolds

ghost

I read this book in one sitting and longed for more, more, more!

2. Anything by Kristin Cashore

kristin cashore

Every time I end a Kristin Cashore book, I wish I could relive it again. Unlike the other books on my list, these books are already quite long, so including this on the list makes me chuckle. More pages, please! Psst—she has a new book coming out in September!

3. Endangered by Eliot Schrefer

endangered

This book is much too short because I have so much love for it. I would love to have more of it! Can we make that happen?

4. Nothing by Janne Teller

nothing

Gosh, I love this book. When I got to the end, I felt like it needed—it had—to be longer. I didn’t want it to be over!

5. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck

of mice and men

Ah, I love this little book. I have it memorized because I taught it so many times. I wish there was more to soak in!

Kellee

Man! I try to get to these before Ricki just because we so often have the same opinion. I very much agree about Ghost, Endangered, and Kristin Cashore books! Here are some other books I wish were longer because I loved being in the story so much:

1. Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

I want to know how Melody grows up. I want to see who else makes a difference in her life. I want to see what difference she makes in the lives of others.

2. Seeds of America series by Laurie Halse Anderson

I love Isabel and Curzon, and I was just getting to know Ruth. I want more. But I know it is over. 🙁

3. Scar Island by Dan Gemeinhart AND The Honest Truth by Dan Gemeinhart

Both of these books are so good, but they seem like they are just telling us the stories of Mark and Jonathan. When we Skyped with Dan, my book club kept asking questions about what happens after the book, but he was very clear that anything outside of the pages is not his story to tell.

4. The Seventh Wish by Kate Messner

I wasn’t done with Charlie. I want to know more about her. And I want to know more about how her family continues to grow and deal.

5. Booked by Kwame Alexander 

If you’ve read this, you know exactly why I wish there were more pages! If you haven’t read it, read it to find out!

Which books do you wish had more pages in them?

RickiSig and Signature